More Tales of Indiscretion

No, I will not be regailing you with stories of folks who took part in the Vancouver Riots, only to find their faces splattered all over Facebook (aka the new Big Brother), incriminating them in a crime (that really is Dumber than Snake Mittens too), no my wife told me a story from the Charlotte, North Carolina Airport and how maybe some conversations should be kept private.

My wife was having a lay over waiting for a flight to another location, so she was sitting patiently at the gate. She noticed that the Airport had many private looking alcoves and areas where “telecommuters” could get things done with some privacy (all of them seemed to have rocking chairs too?!?), however she then also noticed a gentleman sitting in the middle of the waiting area talking on his cell phone (in a very loud tone as well (if you think that my wife is a professional interloper or nosy body)).

This gentleman was concerned because he seemed to have had to purchase his airline tickets twice and he was not sure whether he had enough money in his account to pay for all of it (or he was afraid of bouncing cheques or something like that), so he was talking to his bank (my wife assumed).

The gentleman said loudly, “… yes take the money from the account that had $40,000 in it and transfer over $3000 just in case…”, or something to that effect. He then announced boldly and loudly, “… my access card number? It is xxxx xxx xxx xxxx…” (no my wife did not write it down and she did not recall it either).

As I heard this story I went WTF, is this person insane? I don’t care if he has not given out his PIN number for his access card or which bank he deals with or any other info, people who know how to defraud folks need less than this to break into your bank account and cause some severe damage. I was flabbergasted by the story, but my wife assured me the gentleman did not seem ill at ease doing this and nobody else around him pointed out what he was doing was very financially dangerous.

It’s pretty simple the rules for using telephone banking:

  1. Never do it in a public place where untrusted folks can listen in
  2. Don’t use your wireless phones at home (all a thief needs to do is listen in to the tones and they have your banking info)
  3. Don’t really do this over your cell phone if you can help it

Sometimes being paranoid is the right way to be, especially when it comes to the security of your money.

 

 

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