Notice of Determination on Disability Tax Credit

About three weeks ago we mailed in (via certified mail, so we got a tracking ID for the envelope we sent to the CRA) our re-application for the disability tax credit certificate (DTCC) for my son. We were not really sure how long it was going to take, however, yesterday we received the response about our son’s eligibility for the DTCC.

Evidently we sent enough, and the correct information, as the CRA completed their review and now my son is eligible for another 8 years (until he turns 18), and his DTCC was extended, which is a relief to us. This means we can continue to receive the child tax benefits, and also continue to contribute to his Registered Disability Savings Plan (RDSP) as well.

The letter of confirmation for the DTCC from the CRA is very clear but it has two very interesting paragraphs:

You will have to file a new, full completed Form T2201, Disability Tax Credit Certificate, for the 2024 tax year or earlier if we ask for one, so we can review your son’s eligibility for DTC.

In the meantime, if your dependant’s medical condition improves to the point that the impairment would not longer meet the eligibility criteria for disability tax credit, you must let us know.

Interesting how the CRA can still ask for an updated T2201 at any time, if they wish to review my son’s eligibility, and that I must tell them if he is no longer impaired ? Autism Spectrum isn’t cured, but I guess this is the CRA being thorough ?

Another interesting stanza states:

Please note that you are responsible for any fees charged by a medical practitioner to complete Form 2201, Disability Tax Credit Certificate, or to provide us with additional information. These fees are medical expenses. See line 330 of the General Income Tax and Benefit Guide

In our case we did have to pay for the Speech Pathologist Report, which was included in the documentation sent to the CRA, so that is now a medical expense (remember other things can be a medical expense as well).

A final helpful section stated:

If you need more information about the Registered Disability Savings Plan (RDSP), please see the additional RDSP information sheet.

Yes, there was a helpful sheet about RDSPs included with the letter. It suggested checking out the Employment and Social Development Canada (ESDC) web site, which is hepful as well. It also pointed out that the Government may deposit up to $90,000 into the RDSP over the lifetime of the beneficiary (another good reason to have one). ESDC is on Twitter too.

Time to Re-apply for the Disability Tax Credit Certificate

{ 2 comments }

Direct Deposit Enrolment for Government Benefits

Here is a quick Tuesday update to remind you that Government Cheques will be going away very soon (April 2016), and you can easily sign up for direct deposit, if you can remember your on-line banking.

Life of a Government Cheque

Journey of a Government Cheque

How hard is it? Let’s just walk through it for you.

First question to answer is, do you receive Government Cheques for any reason? You sure? Check this web page which has a list of all the different folks that can send you cheques, which include:

You sure you don’t receive any of these?

Next, congratulations! You have figured out you need to set up direct deposit (the first step to solving any problem is admitting you have a problem). How can you fix this? Click on any of those links above and you will be told how, however, let’s try a different way of doing things, let’s go to the CRA and check out how your Tax Refund might be done.

  1. Go to your CRA MyAccount page  (link on that page). What the hell is a MyAccount? Don’t worry, you don’t need to create one, you can simply log in with your On-Line Banking credentials (if you don’t have on-line banking I would strongly suggest going to a Services Canada Office to set things up).
  2. Log into CRA My Account with your on-line banking credentials
  3. If you have done things right you will then be at a home page that will have many different and wonderful things you can do with the CRA. Select the Accounts and Payment tab
  4. Voila here is where you set up your direct deposit, or alter it so that it goes to a different account, or stop it from being deposited (although why you would do that I do not know).

It is just that simple people, so why haven’t you set it up yet? Get off your duff and do it!

{ 0 comments }

The CRA Does Not Like Change

Here is a Tuesday Quickie for you, I have pointed this one out a few times, but my Theory has been proven:

Whenever you have a major change in your life that causes a change in  your tax status, the CRA will ask for you to send receipts to verify it (i.e. a Review not an audit).

A simple theory, but it has been proven countless times for me:

  • Each time one of my kids started at University, either I or my child was asked to supply T2202A forms from the school.
  • When they moved from residence to a rental off campus, receipts for the rental
  • When I claimed my son’s school fees as a medical expense.
  • My middle daughter has just started a Chiropractic College, and the tuition fees are MUCH higher, thus the CRA wants receipts.


It’s not a big thing, and fairly easy to remedy, just keep this in mind, and keep those receipts.

{ 0 comments }

What is My Tax Bracket ?

Saw that question (What is my tax bracket?) in Money Magazine as a frequently asked question, so let me help you out (for those in Canada), with a few helpful links and a few more helpful tables and such helping you figure out What is Your Tax Bracket. As a precursor to these hints, you should always check with the CRA or a licensed Tax Accountant if you have questions about your Tax Brackets and such.

Where do you find out about the current Federal Income Tax Brackets (for you as an Individual, not you as a corporation) ? Go to this page for individuals. That page will tell you the following (for 2015):

Federal tax rates for 2015

  • 15% on the first $44,701 of taxable income, +
  • 22% on the next $44,700 of taxable income (on the portion of taxable income over $44,701 up to $89,401),+
  • 26% on the next $49,185 of taxable income (on the portion of taxable income over $89,401 up to $138,586), +
  • 29% of taxable income over $138,586.
Tax Bracket

The Infamous Bad Pun

Remember that is Taxable Income, so this is what is left after you have taken your deductions, and credits and such. Remember also that if you earn less than the Basic Personal Amount (line 300) you don’t have to pay taxes (for kids with summer jobs and such).

However, that is not all, remember that you have Provincial Income Tax as well, and here are the 2015 numbers to keep in mind too:

Provincial/territorial tax rates (combined chart)
Provinces/territories Rate(s)
Newfoundland and Labrador 7.7% on the first $35,008 of taxable income, +
12.5% on the next $35,007, +
13.3% on the amount over $70,015
Prince Edward Island 9.8% on the first $31,984 of taxable income, +
13.8% on the next $31,985, +
16.7% on the amount over $63,969
Nova Scotia 8.79% on the first $29,590 of taxable income, +
14.95% on the next $29,590, +
16.67% on the next $33,820, +
17.5% on the next $57,000, +
21% on the amount over $150,000
New Brunswick 9.68% on the first $39,973 of taxable income, +
14.82% on the next $39,973, +
16.52% on the next $50,029, +
17.84% on the amount over $129,975
Quebec Go to Income tax rates (Revenu Québec Web site).
Ontario 5.05% on the first $40,922 of taxable income, +
9.15% on the next $40,925, +
11.16% on the next $68,153, +
12.16% on the next $70,000, +
13.16 % on the amount over $220,000
Manitoba 10.8% on the first $31,000 of taxable income, +
12.75% on the next $36,000, +
17.4% on the amount over $67,000
Saskatchewan 11% on the first $44,028 of taxable income, +
13% on the next $81,767, +
15% on the amount over $125,795
Alberta 10% of taxable income
British Columbia 5.06% on the first $37,869 of taxable income, +
7.7% on the next $37,871, +
10.5% on the next $11,218, +
12.29% on the next $18,634, +
14.7% on the next $45,458, +
16.8% on the amount over $151,050
Yukon 7.04% on the first $44,701 of taxable income, +
9.68% on the next $44,700, +
11.44% on the next $49,185, +
12.76% on the amount over $138,586
Northwest Territories 5.9% on the first $40,484 of taxable income, +
8.6% on the next $40,487, +
12.2% on the next $50,670, +
14.05% on the amount over $131,641
Nunavut 4% on the first $42,622 of taxable income, +
7% on the next $42,621, +
9% on the next $53,343, +
11.5% on the amount over $138,586

Addendum

A commenter has pointed out another excellent resource in this area TaxTips.ca , check them out too!

{ 6 comments }

Tax Time! TurboTax Giveaway

Yes, it’s that time of the year, where the Tax man is beefing up their Helpline, RRSP vendors are out for your last buck, and financial bloggers like me give you useful tax tips, in Canada, it is Tax Time!

This is the season when folks like Mark over at the Blunt Bean Counter earn their money, and I start getting odd e-mails about whether you can claim your dog as a dependent (the simple answer is NO! you cannot).

Tax Time

Tax Time

How better to celebrate this festive season than a Turbotax (on-line) giveaway. What is Turbotax on-line? Here is a helpful blurb about the software:

With TurboTax Online or ImpôtRapide en ligne, you prep your taxes and pay at the end, when you’re happy with the result and ready to NETFILE. 

As this is Canada, I like to stick with the concept that contest winners need to answer a skill testing question, or have to do something (I don’t give stuff away for free, just ask my kids).

This year we have a simple question that, you must answer in the comments of this article, by February  6th to be considered for this free software (I am giving 3 codes away).

Question: The stupidest thing I ever left off my tax return was _____________
(fill in the blank)

The winner will be chosen (at random) from the entries that qualify (i.e. you can’t just put in, “GIVE ME THE  SOFTWARE” and be considered).


Tax Software That Gets You Every Penny You Deserve
NB: You must supply a valid e-mail address or your entry will not qualify.

{ 41 comments }

%d bloggers like this: