More Full Time Jobs in Canada in June

The numbers from Stats Canada on Friday were effectively unchanged, with Unemployment running at 6.8%  but there were some interesting tidbits in there, if you chose to dig deeply to find them.

In June, gains of 65,000 in full-time work were offset by losses of 71,000 in part-time.

So we really lost 6000 jobs, and they were part-time, month to month, so good and bad news in that we lost jobs but we have more full-time jobs.

Employment Graph

Employment For Past Little While

How do we compare to our friends down south?

In June, the employment rate in Canada (adjusted to US concepts) was 61.9%, compared with 59.3% in the United States. On a year-over-year basis, the employment rate was unchanged in Canada, while it increased by 0.3 percentage points in the United States.

So in terms of jobs, this talk of recession in Canada might be premature, but then again, recession has little to do with jobs (directly).

Some disheartening news in the report was:

Employment declined for youths aged 15 to 24 and increased for men aged 55 and over. There was little change among the other demographic groups.

Youth unemployment is still running at the 12% range, and for men 55 and over my concern is, that is me!

Unemployment in Canada

Unemployment for Past Little While

The graph keeps showing no change in unemployment for a good long while, is the Canadian economy stuck?

The Big Table

 

The big report this time is from Employment by class of worker and industry (based on NAICS1) – Seasonally adjusted, and Stats Canada is now making it easily changed for your needs:

  May
2015
June
2015
May to
June 2015
June 2014
to June 2015
thousands thousands change in
thousands
change in
thousands
Class of worker
Employees 15,203.8 15,219.7 15.9 194.0
Self-employed 2,749.9 2,727.7 -22.2 -17.9
Public/private sector employees
Public 3,566.5 3,608.7 42.2 75.8
Private 11,637.3 11,611.0 -26.3 118.2
All industries 17,953.8 17,947.4 -6.4 176.1
Goods-producing sector 3,871.3 3,869.4 -1.9 -11.5
Agriculture 292.5 287.9 -4.6 -16.4
Natural resources3 354.8 358.3 3.5 -8.2
Utilities 140.3 138.7 -1.6 1.7
Construction 1,363.5 1,371.5 8.0 7.9
Manufacturing 1,720.2 1,713.0 -7.2 3.5
Services-producing sector 14,082.5 14,078.0 -4.5 187.6
Trade 2,739.8 2,742.4 2.6 14.9
Transportation and warehousing 924.2 931.7 7.5 35.3
Finance, insurance, real estate and leasing 1,111.8 1,116.8 5.0 39.5
Professional, scientific and technical services 1,353.9 1,360.8 6.9 24.6
Business, building and other support services 769.6 755.9 -13.7 22.2
Educational services 1,283.5 1,283.6 0.1 44.4
Health care and social assistance 2,289.6 2,295.2 5.6 81.2
Information, culture and recreation 742.5 740.1 -2.4 -11.6
Accommodation and food services 1,222.8 1,214.1 -8.7 20.3
Other services 762.8 746.0 -16.8 -62.8
Public administration 881.9 891.4 9.5 -20.6

Note(s):

The sum of individual categories may not always add up to the total as a result of rounding.

Source(s):

CANSIM tables 282-0088 and 282-0089.

 

Reports from 2015

So far here are the employment reports on this site:

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Good Job Picture for September in Canada

Friday before the Long Weekend our friends at Stats Canada published some relatively good news for the Canadian Economy, with 74000 more folks employed in September (2014). Coincidently the unemployment rate dropped 2/10 of a percent as well, so all in all a rosier picture, with unemployment the lowest it has been since December 2008 (nearly the beginning of the economic collapse).

Empoloyment

Chart 1 Employment for past while

The graph seems to look more optimistic. The areas where employment increased the most was youths aged 15 to 24 and women aged 25 to 54. The more youth employment is a very good thing for the economy, as this is the area where employment has lagged badly since the great collapse.

The sectors where there were increases in employment were in accommodation and food services; health care and social assistance; construction; natural resources; also in finance, insurance, real estate and leasing. There was some bad employment news was  numbers were down in educational services.

For me, a really good piece of news is that the number of private sector employees increased in September, which means the economy is creating jobs (not just the government).

Adjusted to the concepts used in the United States, the unemployment rate in Canada was 5.9% in September, the same as the US rate.

Good to see we are keeping up with our American cousins in terms of job creation.

Unemployment

Unemployment Graph for the Past Little While

The Big Table

As usual I include some data from the Big Data tables from Stats Canada so you can see the data yourself and make your own conclusions:

Employment by class of worker and industry (based on NAICS1) – Seasonally adjusted

August 2014 September 2014 Std error2 August to
Sept 2014
Sept 2013
to Sept 2014
August to Sept
2014
Sept 2013
to Sept 2014
thousands change in thousands % change
Class of worker
Employees 15,096.8 15,226.4 35.6 129.6 150.2 0.9 1.0
Self-employed 2,754.7 2,699.1 25.9 -55.6 0.2 -2.0 0.0
Public/private sector employees
Public 3,676.0 3,682.0 25.0 6.0 88.1 0.2 2.5
Private 11,420.8 11,544.4 38.2 123.6 62.0 1.1 0.5
All industries 17,851.4 17,925.5 28.5 74.1 150.4 0.4 0.8
Goods-producing sector 3,835.9 3,896.1 26.0 60.2 -12.8 1.6 -0.3
Agriculture 298.4 295.2 7.8 -3.2 -19.3 -1.1 -6.1
Natural resources3 352.2 379.9 7.9 27.7 -1.1 7.9 -0.3
Utilities 150.2 148.9 5.3 -1.3 -2.9 -0.9 -1.9
Construction 1,322.7 1,352.6 17.6 29.9 13.3 2.3 1.0
Manufacturing 1,712.4 1,719.5 18.9 7.1 -2.9 0.4 -0.2
Services-producing sector 14,015.6 14,029.4 34.4 13.8 163.2 0.1 1.2
Trade 2,713.3 2,700.4 24.3 -12.9 -20.9 -0.5 -0.8
Transportation and warehousing 887.4 878.6 14.6 -8.8 18.9 -1.0 2.2
Finance, insurance, real estate and leasing 1,087.7 1,108.6 16.7 20.9 -31.1 1.9 -2.7
Professional, scientific and technical services 1,391.2 1,376.2 18.7 -15.0 25.8 -1.1 1.9
Business, building and other support services 693.6 694.7 14.2 1.1 -33.5 0.2 -4.6
Educational services 1,331.1 1,286.9 16.2 -44.2 10.6 -3.3 0.8
Health care and social assistance 2,216.8 2,248.5 19.4 31.7 69.3 1.4 3.2
Information, culture and recreation 796.6 788.9 14.8 -7.7 -0.8 -1.0 -0.1
Accommodation and food services 1,149.3 1,196.9 17.1 47.6 64.2 4.1 5.7
Other services 770.3 775.6 13.5 5.3 -0.1 0.7 0.0
Public administration 978.5 974.2 12.4 -4.3 60.9 -0.4 6.7
1.North American Industry Classification System.
2.Average standard error for change in two consecutive months. See “Sampling variability of estimates” in the section “About the Labour Force Survey” at the end of the publication Labour Force Information (Catalogue number71-001-X) for further explanations.
3.Also referred to as forestry, fishing, mining, quarrying, oil and gas.
Note(s): 
Related CANSIM tables 282-0088 and 282-0089. The sum of individual categories may not always add up to the total as a result of rounding.

 

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