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I Like My Money Like I Like My Coffee

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Big Cajun Man 2020 (with respect to Letterkenny)
I Like My Money This Way

Frankly this makes as much sense as a lot of financial advice that I hear these days. At least the punch line is on point.

The Debt doesn’t matter crowd seems to think that due to low interest rates, debt is an afterthought. Unless the entire economy changes, Debt is going to comeback big time.

These days it is reminiscent of the hay days of the Internet Bubble. Back then the statement was:

Profits don’t matter. It’s eyeballs!

90’s Internet Bubble Investing Credo

That drove the 90’s Internet bubble. When you read that I am sure you smirked or laughed how insane that reads, but it was the gospel of investing in the 90’s. We saw the explosion of that bubble, and the associated side effects (i.e. loss in wealth for day to day investors).

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I like my women, like I like my coffee. Respected in the workplace and compensated at an equitable and fair level.

Big Cajun Man 2020

Same Topic

best advice

I wrote an article in 2005 about Experts? It’s your decision where Harry S. Dent Jr., back in 2000 advised how great the Internet was as an investment. This was written as the Bubble Exploded.

Index Investors, who purchase Canadian Indexes need to remember they are Highly Exposed on Banks. Banks hold a high portion of most major Canadian Indexes.

Key investment strategy

You need Two Key Investment Strategies, if you plan on investing for the long term. The first is easy, when to buy, but what might be the second?

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MER : A Worm in the RESP Money Tree

The RESP can be like a Money Tree for parents (and children) wanting to save for  post-secondary education.   If you invest your money you can get:

All of this free money is there for the asking. Truly it is like having a Magic Money Tree, however, as with all orchards, you can lose some of your fruit due to  worms.

In this case the worms can be:

  • High MER (Management Fee) Mutual Funds, many of the time they are hidden under the guise of Balanced Funds.
  • Badly performing Mutual Funds, usually pushed by an “Investment Person” who is making money on the purchase.
  • Very low interest paying saving devices (e.g. Bond Funds, Money Market Funds, GICs and HISA).

These financial worms chew into the potential growth of your RESP. Remember that most RESPs can have about a 23 year lifespan. The government stops adding money after the child turns 18, but  the  money  can continue to  grow for  a while after that, unless the  worms get in there.

When I opened my kids’ RESPs (more than 23 years ago), I didn’t know much about investing, so I spoke to my Canada Trust “Investment Person”. This person warned me that this was a short-term investment, where I didn’t want to risk losing money, so I should put the funds in safe Mutual Funds. I didn’t know so that is what I ended up getting was a small amount in a Balanced Mutual Fund (MER 2.8%) a larger amount in a Bond Fund (paying 1.2%) and a Money Market Fund (which paid 0.9%).

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As time passed, I learned more about investing, and started looking at my TD Mutual Funds (CT had been bought by TD), and saw the High MER I was paying. I read about the E-series Funds from TD, saw they had low MERs, so I went to TD to ask how to  transfer to  these Mutual Funds. You would have thought I was about to fall into an abyss, the way the investment person reacted, but I was not to be dissuaded. I got all the needed forms and changed the RESPs so that I could purchase the E-series funds.

I changed my investment mix, to be more like my other Index Fund portfolios, while still holding all grant money in safe(r) funds (i.e. Money Market funds). I didn’t want to lose the grant money, so I figured they were safe in a Money Market fund (which is wrong, Money Market funds can lose value too).

I lost a great deal of possible growth during that time, to High MER funds and badly chosen Mutual funds as well.

Don’t let the worms eat away at the growth of your RESPs.

BCM 2020

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Not Asking is Rejection by Default

I have written many times about if you don’t ask the answer is always no, but the title of this post is also a good turn of phrase. Too many times folks feel they have no one to ask for help, so they just give up. Most of the time that is exactly what service companies want you to do.

Many times return procedures are convoluted, complex or just downright silly, but it is to stop you from returning things. If you keep it, but don’t want it, they have won.

A good example is, if you want to use TD E-series mutual funds, inside your TD Mutual Fund account, it is not an easy procedure. You must apply via a written form, and wait for the “OK” from them to be able to buy them. Once you are granted permission, you then must figure out which funds are the E-series funds. If you wish to cash the E-series Funds out of the account, you must first go on-line, transfer them to a Money Market account, and then go into a TD Branch, to do the cash out?

The best way to deal with this, is simply don’t use the TD Mutual Fund vehicle. Other reasons to be wary, will be the Risk Profile trade cancellation issues.

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This example shows that the system seems to be set up to discourage you from doing what you want. Worse, to do nothing, when you should be rebalancing or other important investment tasks.

Why Not Ask?

This is the question. If you do not ask for what you want, you will rarely get what you want. You may sound like a pest, you may upset whoever you are dealing with, so be polite, but ask for what you want. The worst they can say is, No.

Not Asking is Rejection by Default

Unknown, but words to live by

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COVID-19 Are we F*cked ?

This is being written during March 2020 the COVID-19 Pandemic. At the time of publishing things were quite confused and unsure, but this is my simple opinion of where we in Canada may stand financially.

We are f*cked.

Is this me being overly alarmist? I hope so, but there are countless areas that are not likely to ever recover from the Pandemic.

As an addendum, this is added in September, and we are talking about having another lockdown. In Ottawa if you don’t follow the COVID protocols you will be fined $5000.

Travel and Vacation Industry

Dead.

  • The Air BnB industry and that side dodge is done. People will not be travelling much, for the next year or two. What happens to all those condos in Toronto that were bought with that in mind?
  • Cruises and Cruiselines? Good night, they are now synonymous with the Pandemic, if they recover it will be not in the near future.
  • Travel bloggers? Freebies are not going to be given out much, I think this gig is going to curtail or die off too. At this moment, Las Vegas is closed. This is not the W.C. Fields joke about visiting Philadelphia, this is Vegas, which never closes.
  • Airlines? These may recover if business travel returns, but they are going to take a beating, and will ask for a bail out.

Real Estate

F*cked

  • Construction sites are shutting down, thus screwing up the whole system.
    • People who are buying the new properties need to sell, but will have nowhere to go.
    • No one is buying a house right now, and when will they start?
  • Mortgages are being called and payments are being missed, renters are not being given reprieves either. What happens next? People being kicked out on the street? I doubt it, but you really don’t know right now.
    • Big wave of homelessness? I hope not, but the economic models aren’t there for this.
  • Over priced real estate may soon be worth less than their financing (i.e. mortgage), will we seeing folks walking away from their expensive high-rise downtown condo?

The Stock Market

F*cked currently having daily circuit-breaker calls.

  • Advisors are telling their customers to sell now, thus locking in their losses. They are following the buy high, sell low credo, that is not synonymous with getting rich.
  • FIRE and the entire early retirement craze should be forgotten for now. The markets have eviscerated those lofty goals for now.
  • The markets may rebound completely as it did in 2008, but surprisingly not as many folks got rich on that rebound as you might think.

Employment

F*cked, we had a weird job dynamic already, (the side gig world) but now it is F*cked.

  • My kids’ generation has had to have 3 part-time jobs to add up to a full time job, but none of those jobs exist right now. Restaurant jobs, are gone mostly due to the restaurants being closed. Retail jobs are gone, stores are closed.
  • The growth industries are:
    • Delivery, that is about it. Everything is being delivered now, but does anyone make any money doing this?
    • Government, because there is going to need to be a big government to deal with a broken country. Is this a good thing? I don’t think so, but I am a small L libertarian.
    • Debt, the world of debt is going to explode in terms of big money. Payday Loans, alternate loans and Bankruptcy Trustees are going to make big money in the short and mid term.
  • Will industries other than Travel go in the crapper? Lots of potential there
    • Retail, when folks don’t have a job, they aren’t going to be buying a lot of stuff.
    • Cars? If interest rates stay low, they may be OK, but if interest rates go up, this could make folks keep their old cars.
    • Oil and Gas already is in the crapper, with gas at 70 cents a litre, which makes it not worth working on the Oil Sands in Alberta.

Inflation

Coming, much like the four horsemen.

  • Governments are injecting Infinite money into the economy to try to prop it back up. I am not an economist, but even I know this is the recipe for Inflation (ever hyper-inflation). If money loses value, prices go up. Most folks don’t remember the 1970’s but this could be where we are heading (if not worse).
  • If we end up in an Inflationary spiral Interest Rates will have to be used to control things, and that is a world many folks have not lived in. I have seen 19% CSB’s in my lifetime, will I see them again?
  • Predatory loan companies making money on this? Absolutely.
  • Bankruptcy trustees may not be able to keep up with the tsunami coming at them.

Alarmist Clap Trap?

I really hope so. I hate to think we are financially f*cked as badly as I am guessing we are, but these are uncharted financial waters. I am not an economist, but I have lived for 60 years, and seen a lot of financial changes, and this one has me scared.

I hope we all come out of this with our health, and if we have that, all this other stuff can be dealt with, in some fashion or another.

Remember when we said, Get Out of Debt, it gives you options? This is what we meant.

What to Do?

First thing, take this article as simply a warning of what could happen. Next, make a plan for your financial world for:

  • The next week, what are you going to spend on? Why? Can you afford it?
  • The next month, assuming this stays the way it will.
  • Six Months, where hopefully around Autumn things start to turn around in terms of normalcy.
  • An overall recovery plan.
    • How are you going to recover your savings?
    • What is your retirement plan, given what has happened?
    • How do you plan around something like this happening again?
      • Hint: GET OUT OF DEBT !

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5 Mistakes Rich Folks Make

I read with great amusement an article in Business Insider Rich people make the same 5 mistakes over and over. I found it amusing, because it attempts to fool you into thinking that if you act like rich folk, you’ll become one. Unfortunately, Lies travel faster than truth.

Maybe the article is attempting to convince you that Rich Folk and you are similar, since you make the same mistakes? This is hardly the case.

Rich People Can Make Financial Mistakes

That is what you should take from this story. Rich folk have the luxury of being able to make financial mistakes, they can recover from them. Most of us don’t have the wiggle room to escape financial blunders.

Rich folks can become like the rest of us, if they make mistakes, that is true. The story the great Investment Monolith wants you to believe is that the reverse is possible too. I think it is possible but the former is much more likely than the latter.

Mistakes are easily made, we all do them, every day. To succeed financially takes dedication, discipline and damn hard work. The mistakes mentioned in this article are bad:

  1. Assuming they can out-earn bad spending habits. That is not a mistake reserved to the rich, in fact this is how we all dig the big hole called debt.
  2. Not automating their savings. Another spin on pay yourself first, which is something you can do as long as you are not spending more than you make.
  3. Not speaking with a professional for tax-planning or estate-planning purposes. This seems like sound advice, if you take it as, making sure you do your taxes well, and you have your Will and Power of Attorney up to date.
  4. Assuming they don’t need a financial adviser because they’re successful. This is the heart of the article, as it seems to have been written by a financial professional. I have a great mistrust of the financial industry in general and in advisors in specific, but if you use this type of service, you had better trust them (and you had better watch them closely). In the end, it is your money.
  5. Not having any idea how much they spend, again not a mistake reserved to the rich. I had no idea I was that far in debt ? We’ve talked about that before.

What Should You Do ?

Don’t make financial mistakes? Easier said than done, but you must be careful with your money. Don’t make rich folk financial mistakes? Absolutely, because you don’t have the luxury of making them.

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