Tuition Fees Down

Stats Canada put out their yearly report Tuition fees (in Canada) for degree programs, 2019/2020 a while ago. It has some interesting data including the fact that Tuition Fee costs for undergrad students dropped for this year (with a caveat).

Ontario led the way with a 9.9% Tuition drop. In fact in the rest of Canada Tuition went UP? Isn’t it great how large data sets can skew things?

Table 37-10-0045-01 UndergraduateGraduate
 annual % changeannual % change
Canada-5.3-4.5
Newfoundland and Labrador2.30.0
Prince Edward Island2.02.0
Nova Scotia3.52.9
New Brunswick7.33.5
Quebec3.73.8
Ontario-9.9-9.1
Manitoba5.33.6
Saskatchewan3.34.1
Alberta0.03.3
British Columbia2.01.3
Yukon8.5..

Remember we are only speaking of Tuition Fees and the Business of University Fees encompasses far more than just tuition. Evidently those fees have dropped slightly as well, but I am skeptical.

The other factor in Ontario is the revamping of the OSAP pay outs, so students get a large amount less than they have in previous years.

International Students face a tuition hike, which is where a lot of Universities are making their money.

Most Expensive Degrees

A very good graphic explains that.

Tuition Fees
If your Child wants to be a Doctor or Dentist, better have an RESP

The above graphic should emphasize the importance of an RESP for parents who think their kids might go to a post-secondary program. Don’t expect Tuition Fees to drop again any time soon.

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Inflation at 2011 Levels ?

We found out that Inflation is now at 2011 Levels, at 3.0% on a year-over-year basis. So what? Remember the Bank of Canada’s ideal rate is 2.0%, so this will most likely reinforce another Bank of Canada rate increase (in October). Now the B of C’s calculated Inflation is only 2.0% , but I don’t think they can ignore this kind of jump.

I haven’t commented on inflation for a while, but this report is important, for a lot of reasons. With the tariff wars that are going on, inflation is going to continue to rise (IMHO), and that will mean higher interest rates. Maybe someone will find sense and stop this Testosterone Laced bullsh*t trade war, but I doubt it.

Note also that Interest rates going up, contribute to Inflation (see the table below). Interesting spiralling effect. Stats Canada used to put out a more detailed report, but they have discontinued that report.

Biggest Inflation Contributors Over Past Year

July 2017 to July 2018
% change
Main contributors to the 12-month change
Main upward contributors
Gasoline 25.4
Air transportation 28.2
Food purchased from restaurants 4.4
Mortgage interest cost 5.2
Purchase of passenger vehicles 2.0
Main downward contributors
Telephone services -5.1
Traveller accommodation -4.1
Natural gas -5.7
Digital computing equipment and devices -3.5
Prescribed medicines -2.8

Consumer Price Index Increases by Category

CPI by Category

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Low Inflation Means No More Interest Hikes ?

It would be imprudent to assume that low inflation, will mean no more interest hikes. The Bank of Canada has wanted to lower interest rate stimulation, and they will continue with this policy. They may slow down their rate plan but rates are going up.

Stats Canada on Friday published the monthly inflation report. The report overall shows that inflation is running at 1.0%, but as usual those numbers are deceiving. The detailed report shows a better view on things.

Main upward contributors:

  • Homeowners’ replacement cost (+4.1%)
  • Food purchased from restaurants (+2.5%)
  • Travel tours (+7.0%)
  • Traveller accommodation (+7.1%)
  • Natural gas (+10.0%)

Main downward contributors:

  • Electricity (-5.3%)
  • Gasoline (-1.4%)
  • Women’s clothing (-2.5%)
  • Men’s clothing (-2.9%)
  • Household appliances (-3.3%)

I am glad to see groceries specific are not mentioned here, but food purchased from restaurants took a bump. The generic graphic gives you a better overall view though.

Inflation by Category

Inflation by Category for June 2017

B of C Final Words on the Economy

The Bank of Canada has the following view on the Canadian Economy.


Growth in the Canadian economy is projected to reach 2.8 per cent this year before slowing to 2.0 per cent next year and 1.6 per cent in 2019.

That seems to be a very modest view on things, however, it all depends on what happens down south. Is it safe ? I have no idea.

2017 Inflation Discussion

Reports on inflation in 2017 so far.



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Gasoline Pushed Inflation to 2.1 %

The January Consumer Price Index numbers came in from Stats Canada and it seems like gasoline pushed inflation to 2.1 % year over year in January. A rate of 2.1% enters the Bank of Canada worrisome zone. Using the Bank of Canada’s measures things are not as worrisome. If you check the Bank’s site, their numbers show below 2.0% which is in their “acceptable” zone.

Highlights for January

Main contributors to the 12-month change in the CPI, Main upward contributors:

  1. Gasoline (+20.6%)
  2. Purchase of passenger vehicles (+3.8%)
  3. Homeowners’ replacement cost (+4.3%)
  4. Natural gas (+15.6%)
  5. Food purchased from restaurants (+2.3%)

Main downward contributors:

  1. Fresh vegetables (-15.5%)
  2. Fresh fruit (-10.8%)
  3. Meat (-1.7%)
  4. Bakery products (-3.2%)
  5. Cereal products (excluding baby food) (-5.3%)

Great news there in that fresh fruit and veggies are lower in price. We should all be eating a bit more healthy this month! The very bad news is Gas and Natural Gas prices sky-rocketing. Might want to turn the furnace down a little, and look at those hybrids again?

Historical Electricity Prices?

Stats Canada added a fun historical section, and this month, electricity prices.

Electricity has maintained approximately the same basket weight for the past 30 years. Since the basket update in 1986, the basket weight for electricity has ranged from 1.93% to 2.77% of the all-items CPI, and averaged 2.43%.

Given how much electricity prices have shot up in Ontario, wonder if this remains true?

Graph of the Month

CPI with and without gasoline prices is always an exciting graph to check out.

Gasoline Pushed Inflation

CPI or Inflation with and without gasoline included

2017 Inflation Discussion

So far 2017 has only one discussion:



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Surprising Job Picture in Canada in January

A surprising job picture from the Canadian Economy grew more jobs in January (2017), according to Stats Canada. This was unexpected by most economists, so a pleasant surprise (somewhat).

What Kind of Jobs ?

Surprising Employment Picture

Surprising Employment Story
(From Metropolitan Museum of Art Collection)

The unfortunate part of this story is that the economy is creating more part-time jobs (full-time job numbers are virtually unchanged). Why is this economy creating part-time jobs, or is that what is needed?

There is an argument put forward that as the population ages, maybe part-time jobs are what the older folks want? It can’t be that young folks want to have many jobs, with little or no benefits, can it?

Part-Time Jobs

The telling statement from the article is the following:

Despite little change in January, part-time employment was up on a year-over-year basis (+190,000 or +5.6%). In January, 19.6% of employed persons worked part time, compared with 18.8% the same month a year earlier.

Why a growing part-time work force ? This would be a very interesting report if I could find it somewhere.

Unemployment & Employment Graphs

Surprising job picture

Employment & Unemployment Seasonally Adjusted

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