More Full Time Work in Canada in May

On Friday we found out that month to month Canada added 59,000 more jobs in May, however, because more folks were looking for work in May, the Unemployment rate stays rock steady at 6.8% (for the 4th consecutive month). More fun with numbers, since more folks are looking for jobs, even though the economy is adding jobs, it is not fast enough to absorb the new job seekers.

The more encouraging statement in the report is:

In the 12 months to May, employment increased by 192,000 (+1.1%), the result of more full-time work. Over the same period, the total number of hours worked grew by 1.2%.

This is good news, but the fact that there are more folks looking for jobs does temper my expectations.

Overall employment in Canada for past 5 years

Overall employment for past 5 years

Looking at the graph you see that more folks are working, but then you have the unemployment graph and you end up scratching your head a little:

Unemployment rate in Canada for Past 5 years

Unemployment Rate for Past 5 years

Is this a chicken and egg problem, where there are more jobs, thus folks who haven’t been looking start looking again? That may be one explanation, or maybe folks EI have stopped paying out?

Who found these new jobs? Men aged 25 to 54, most of the other demographics were pretty much stable, again, why? More jobs in the Private Sector, is good, and less in the Public Sector might be a good thing (but I like smaller government).

The Big Table

I have edited one of the big tables from the report to show change year over year (make it a little easier to read), but I urge you to read the whole report if you have the time:

Labour force characteristics by age and sex – Seasonally adjusted

April
2015
May
2015
Std Err1
thousands
Both sexes, 15 years and over
Population 29,208.2 29,232.1
Labour force 19,205.1 19,261.3 29.0
Employment 17,894.9 17,953.8 28.7
Full-time 14,506.9 14,537.8 39.2
Part-time 3,388.1 3,416.0 36.1
Unemployment 1,310.2 1,307.6 24.6
Participation rate 65.8 65.9 0.1
Unemployment rate 6.8 6.8 0.1
Employment rate 61.3 61.4 0.1
Part-time rate 18.9 19.0 0.2
Youths, 15 to 24 years
Population 4,441.0 4,438.0
Labour force 2,875.8 2,877.2 16.9
Employment 2,485.8 2,497.7 15.6
Full-time 1,299.0 1,294.1 18.8
Part-time 1,186.8 1,203.5 19.8
Unemployment 390.0 379.5 14.5
Participation rate 64.8 64.8 0.4
Unemployment rate 13.6 13.2 0.5
Employment rate 56.0 56.3 0.3
Part-time rate 47.7 48.2 0.7
Men, 25 years and over
Population 12,113.6 12,127.2
Labour force 8,650.9 8,701.0 15.3
Employment 8,135.8 8,169.5 16.5
Full-time 7,502.9 7,540.9 21.9
Part-time 632.9 628.6 17.9
Unemployment 515.2 531.5 14.3
Participation rate 71.4 71.7 0.1
Unemployment rate 6.0 6.1 0.2
Employment rate 67.2 67.4 0.1
Part-time rate 7.8 7.7 0.2
Women, 25 years and over
Population 12,653.5 12,666.9
Labour force 7,678.4 7,683.1 16.5
Employment 7,273.4 7,286.6 16.0
Full-time 5,705.0 5,702.7 24.9
Part-time 1,568.4 1,583.9 23.7
Unemployment 405.0 396.5 13.2
Participation rate 60.7 60.7 0.1
Unemployment rate 5.3 5.2 0.2
Employment rate 57.5 57.5 0.1
Part-time rate 21.6 21.7 0.3

not applicable

 

Note(s):

The sum of individual categories may not always add up to the total as a result of rounding.

Source(s):

CANSIM table 282-0087.

 

Employments Reports for 2015

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Less Part Time Jobs in April in Canada

That was the word from our friends at Stats Canada on Friday, while there are more full-time jobs, the number of part-time jobs dropped sharply netting a 20,000 job drop in April 2015. As I have grumbled about before the inability to have the statistics reflect or weight the value of full and part time jobs, I guess this is the best data we have for now. For confusion, the unemployment rate remained steady at 6.8% (as it has for the past 3 months? March, and February had ups and downs, but the unemployment remains constant? Amazing).

To quote Stats Canada:

In the 12 months to April, employment increased by 139,000 (+0.8%), with all of the growth in full-time work. Over the same period, the total number of hours worked increased by 0.9%.

More hours worked is actually a good measurement to work with.

Actual employment for past 5 years

Employment for past 5 years

Given this is an election year, remember, these numbers will be interpreted uniquely by each political party, and to confuse them, you have the unemployment graph like this:

Unemployment in Canada for Past 5 years

Unemployment Over Past Little While

Looking at that graph, you’d say things look OK, but that the economy’s ability to create jobs, might be a little suspect?

The big losers this month are women over the age of 55:

For women aged 55 and older, employment declined by 15,000 in April and the unemployment rate edged up to 5.5%. Compared with 12 months earlier, employment was little changed for this group.

What about the young folk? No less jobs, but more of them looking:

While employment among youth aged 15 to 24 was little changed in April, their unemployment rate rose 0.6 percentage points to 13.6%, as more of them searched for work. On a year-over-year basis, youth employment was little changed.

Things are looking moribund in the job market?

Employment By Sector

The Big table this month is interesting, I have edited out the percentage changes to make it a bit more readable.

Employment by class of worker and industry (based on NAICS1) – Seasonally adjusted

  March
2015
April
2015
Std
error2
March
to
April
2015
April 2014
to
April
2015
 

thousands

change in thousands

Class of worker

Employees

15,161.8 15,166.1 34.8 4.3 138.8

Self-employed

2,752.9 2,728.8 24.8 -24.1 0.3
Public/private sector employees

Public

3,605.5 3,585.6 19.6 -19.9 63.5

Private

11,556.3 11,580.5 34.8 24.2 75.3
All industries 17,914.6
17,894.9
28.7 -19.7 139.1
Goods-producing sector 3,876.6 3,861.1 16.2 -15.5 -27.8
Agriculture 297.1 299.1 5.7 2.0 -8.7
Natural resources3 358.1 357.2 5.5 -0.9 -25.3
Utilities 136.5 137.9 2.4 1.4 -0.7
Construction 1,396.6 1,368.2 10.9 -28.4 19.9
Manufacturing 1,688.3 1,698.7 10.3 10.4 -12.9
Services-producing sector 14,038.1 14,033.9 27.2 -4.2 167.0
Trade 2,743.5 2,723.0 14.2 -20.5 -2.7
Transportation and warehousing 918.0 923.4 7.7 5.4 24.4
Finance, insurance, real estate and leasing 1,097.4 1,099.1 8.1 1.7 21.6
Professional, scientific and technical services 1,347.1 1,349.8 10.5 2.7 28.6
Business, building and other support services 745.7 756.7 9.6 11.0 3.8
Educational services 1,290.0 1,287.7 10.3 -2.3 72.5
Health care and social assistance 2,268.9 2,268.9 10.5 0.0 54.6
Information, culture and recreation 751.7 741.9 9.5 -9.8 -23.5
Accommodation and food services 1,219.7 1,223.3 11.2 3.6 28.3
Other services 760.7 766.2 8.1 5.5 -36.7
Public administration 895.4 893.9 6.9 -1.5 -4.1
  1. North American Industry Classification System.
  2. Average standard error for change in two consecutive months. See “Sampling variability of estimates” in the section “About the Labour Force Survey” at the end of the publication Labour Force Information (Catalogue number71-001-X) for further explanations.

3.Also referred to as forestry, fishing, mining, quarrying, oil and gas extraction.

Note(s):

The sum of individual categories may not always add up to the total as a result of rounding.

Source(s):

CANSIM tables 282-0088 and 282-0089.

 

Employments Reports for 2015

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More Part-Time Jobs in Canada, Yea?!?

Friday we got the news that there are more jobs in Canada in March, but they are part-time, thus those who are piecing together “patch work careers” made up of many part-time jobs, have found more of them? This is good news?

The report states:

Employment increased by 29,000 in March, driven by gains in part-time work. The unemployment rate was unchanged at 6.8%.

Over the first quarter, employment gains totalled 63,000 (+0.4%), the result of more part-time work.

In the 12 months to March, employment increased by 138,000 (+0.8%), with most of the growth in full-time work. Over the same period, the total number of hours worked was little changed (+0.1%).

More part-time jobs? Great for old folk who might retire and only want to work part-time, or teenagers looking for some extra cash, but for folks attempting to support  family? Yeh, not so much. I guess if we look at it year over year, there are more full-time jobs, so kind of “yea”?

Employment in Canada

Employment from the Past 5 Years

Unemployment continues to hover at 6.8%, which again, is a bit confusing, and has me wondering how all these numbers are calculated.

Unemployment

Unemployment for Past Little While

If you thought this was “fun with numbers”, the following statement is even more telling:

Adjusted to concepts used in the United States, the unemployment rate in Canada was 5.9% in March, unchanged from February. At the same time, the US unemployment rate was 5.5%, also unchanged from a month earlier.

So the unemployment number might be even lower if we used American job counting methods? This is arithmetic, isn’t it?

The Big Table

More importantly here is one of the big employment tables, that you should read every month, just to understand what you are being told.

Labour force characteristics by age and sex – Seasonally adjusted

February 2015 March 2015 Std err1 Feb to Mar 2015 Mar 2014 to Mar 2015 Feb to Mar 2015 Mar 2014 to Mar 2015
thousands (except rates)

change in thousands (except rates)

% change

Both sexes, 15 years and over
Population 29,160.7 29,183.3 22.6 303.8 0.1 1.1
Labour force 19,197.6 19,224.0 29.0 26.4 111.9 0.1 0.6
Employment 17,885.9 17,914.6 28.7 28.7 138.1 0.2 0.8
Full-time 14,488.2 14,460.0 39.2 -28.2 110.5 -0.2 0.8
Part-time 3,397.8 3,454.6 36.1 56.8 27.6 1.7 0.8
Unemployment 1,311.7 1,309.3 24.6 -2.4 -26.3 -0.2 -2.0
Participation rate 65.8 65.9 0.1 0.1 -0.3
Unemployment rate 6.8 6.8 0.1 0.0 -0.2
Employment rate 61.3 61.4 0.1 0.1 -0.2
Part-time rate 19.0 19.3 0.2 0.3 0.0
Youths, 15 to 24 years
Population 4,446.9 4,443.8 -3.1 -43.2 -0.1 -1.0
Labour force 2,870.9 2,872.4 16.9 1.5 6.8 0.1 0.2
Employment 2,488.4 2,499.0 15.6 10.6 23.3 0.4 0.9
Full-time 1,266.2 1,262.7 18.8 -3.5 -14.6 -0.3 -1.1
Part-time 1,222.1 1,236.3 19.8 14.2 37.9 1.2 3.2
Unemployment 382.6 373.3 14.5 -9.3 -16.6 -2.4 -4.3
Participation rate 64.6 64.6 0.4 0.0 0.7
Unemployment rate 13.3 13.0 0.5 -0.3 -0.6
Employment rate 56.0 56.2 0.3 0.2 1.0
Part-time rate 49.1 49.5 0.7 0.4 1.1
Men, 25 years and over
Population 12,087.5 12,099.8 12.3 168.9 0.1 1.4
Labour force 8,674.0 8,655.8 15.3 -18.2 63.0 -0.2 0.7
Employment 8,139.5 8,135.2 16.5 -4.3 76.3 -0.1 0.9
Full-time 7,497.2 7,486.7 21.9 -10.5 102.2 -0.1 1.4
Part-time 642.3 648.5 17.9 6.2 -25.9 1.0 -3.8
Unemployment 534.5 520.6 14.3 -13.9 -13.3 -2.6 -2.5
Participation rate 71.8 71.5 0.1 -0.3 -0.5
Unemployment rate 6.2 6.0 0.2 -0.2 -0.2
Employment rate 67.3 67.2 0.1 -0.1 -0.3
Part-time rate 7.9 8.0 0.2 0.1 -0.4
Women, 25 years and over
Population 12,626.2 12,639.8 13.6 178.2 0.1 1.4
Labour force 7,652.7 7,695.8 16.5 43.1 42.1 0.6 0.6
Employment 7,258.1 7,280.4 16.0 22.3 38.5 0.3 0.5
Full-time 5,724.7 5,710.6 24.9 -14.1 22.8 -0.2 0.4
Part-time 1,533.4 1,569.8 23.7 36.4 15.7 2.4 1.0
Unemployment 394.6 415.4 13.2 20.8 3.6 5.3 0.9
Participation rate 60.6 60.9 0.1 0.3 -0.5
Unemployment rate 5.2 5.4 0.2 0.2 0.0
Employment rate 57.5 57.6 0.1 0.1 -0.5
Part-time rate 21.1 21.6 0.3 0.4 0.1

not applicable

1.Average standard error for change in two consecutive months. See “Sampling variability of estimates” in the section “About the Labour Force Survey” at the end of the publication Labour Force Information (Catalogue number71-001-X) for further explanations.

Note(s):

The sum of individual categories may not always add up to the total as a result of rounding.

Source(s):

CANSIM table 282-0087.

 

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Unemployment Up in February in Canada

Another confusing message from Stats Canada on Friday, with Employment staying the same (year over year) however, unemployment is up 0.2% (year over year, seasonally adjusted). The more unemployed is actually attributable to a believable reason, there are more folks looking for jobs last month, even though there are more employed folks (confused? don’t worry I am many times, and I have a Math degree).

The optimistic statement in the report was:

Compared with February 2014, full-time employment rose by 121,000 (+0.8%), while there was little change in part-time work. Over the same period, the total number of hours worked was up slightly (+0.2%).

An economy that is creating more full-time jobs is a healthier economy.

Total Employment

Total Employment for the Past Little While

The other question is, where are the folks who weren’t looking for a job, coming from? Let us check the unemployment rate first, then there is another telling statement in the report.

Unemployment Rate in Canada

Unemployment Rate for the Past 5 Years

So, who was looking for jobs?

While youth employment was virtually unchanged in February, their unemployment rate rose 0.5 percentage points to 13.3% as more youths looked for work.

More jobs for old folk over 55 too, shows the cracks in the recovery, which is youth unemployment. Old folk (such as myself) staying employed is fine, but youth unemployment is a very bad thing. That should be the biggest question in the coming election, but I somehow doubt it will be.

Employment by Age

Have a look at this table and see where the jobs are by age

Labour force characteristics by age and sex – Seasonally adjusted

January
2015
February
2015
Std
Err
Jan to
Feb 2015
Feb 2014
to Feb 2015
Jan to Feb
2015
Feb
2014 to Feb
2015
thousands (except rates) change in thousands (except rates) % change
Both sexes, 15 years and over
Population 29,139.2 29,160.7 21.5 305.6 0.1 1.1

Labour force

19,148.4 19,197.6 29.0 49.2 91.3 0.3 0.5

Employment

17,886.9 17,885.9 28.7 -1.0 129.9 0.0 0.7

Full-time

14,454.2 14,488.2 39.2 34.0 121.1 0.2 0.8

Part-time

3,432.7 3,397.8 36.1 -34.9 8.9 -1.0 0.3

Unemployment

1,261.5 1,311.7 24.6 50.2 -38.6 4.0 -2.9
Participation rate 65.7 65.8 0.1 0.1 -0.4
Unemployment rate 6.6 6.8 0.1 0.2 -0.3
Employment rate 61.4 61.3 0.1 -0.1 -0.2
Part-time rate 19.2 19.0 0.2 -0.2 -0.1
Youths, 15 to 24 years
Population 4,451.4 4,446.9 -4.5 -42.5 -0.1 -0.9
Labour force 2,860.5 2,870.9 16.9 10.4 19.7 0.4 0.7
Employment 2,495.6 2,488.4 15.6 -7.2 28.4 -0.3 1.2
Full-time 1,286.5 1,266.2 18.8 -20.3 -16.9 -1.6 -1.3
Part-time 1,209.1 1,222.1 19.8 13.0 45.2 1.1 3.8
Unemployment 364.9 382.6 14.5 17.7 -8.6 4.9 -2.2
Participation rate 64.3 64.6 0.4 0.3 1.1
Unemployment rate 12.8 13.3 0.5 0.5 -0.4
Employment rate 56.1 56.0 0.3 -0.1 1.2
Part-time rate 48.4 49.1 0.7 0.7 1.3
Men, 25 years and over
Population 12,074.8 12,087.5 12.7 169.9 0.1 1.4
Labour force 8,636.1 8,674.0 15.3 37.9 78.8 0.4 0.9
Employment 8,137.5 8,139.5 16.5 2.0 91.1 0.0 1.1
Full-time 7,455.4 7,497.2 21.9 41.8 90.1 0.6 1.2
Part-time 682.1 642.3 17.9 -39.8 1.0 -5.8 0.2
Unemployment 498.6 534.5 14.3 35.9 -12.3 7.2 -2.2
Participation rate 71.5 71.8 0.1 0.3 -0.3
Unemployment rate 5.8 6.2 0.2 0.4 -0.2
Employment rate 67.4 67.3 0.1 -0.1 -0.2
Part-time rate 8.4 7.9 0.2 -0.5 -0.1
Women, 25 years and over
Population 12,613.1 12,626.2 13.1 178.1 0.1 1.4
Labour force 7,651.7 7,652.7 16.5 1.0 -7.2 0.0 -0.1
Employment 7,253.7 7,258.1 16.0 4.4 10.5 0.1 0.1
Full-time 5,712.2 5,724.7 24.9 12.5 47.8 0.2 0.8
Part-time 1,541.5 1,533.4 23.7 -8.1 -37.3 -0.5 -2.4
Unemployment 398.0 394.6 13.2 -3.4 -17.7 -0.9 -4.3
Participation rate 60.7 60.6 0.1 -0.1 -0.9
Unemployment rate 5.2 5.2 0.2 0.0 -0.2
Employment rate 57.5 57.5 0.1 0.0 -0.7
Part-time rate 21.3 21.1 0.3 -0.1 -0.5

not applicable

  1. Average standard error for change in two consecutive months. See “Sampling variability of estimates” in the section “About the Labour Force Survey” at the end of the publication Labour Force Information(Catalogue number71-001-X) for further explanations.

Note(s):

The sum of individual categories may not always add up to the total as a result of rounding.

Source(s):

CANSIM table 282-0087.

 

{ 2 comments }

More Part Time Jobs in Canada in January

Part-Time Job Creation Rules

Stats Canada published their employment numbers on Friday, and on first glance it read well with almost 35,000  new jobs, but our economy seems to continue to create part-time jobs, which are good, but continues to push Gen Y into the, multi-job to make ends meet, life.

To quote our friends they pointed out:

In the 12 months to January, employment increased by 128,000 (+0.7%) with most of the growth in the second half of the period.

In January, part-time employment increased by 47,000 and full-time was little changed.

Part time jobs have some bad side-effects with little or no benefits, no retirement benefits and usually being where employers cut jobs first. Are our employers addicted to part-time employees? Seems like it.

Employment in Canada

Employment continues to rise for the past little while (5 years)
(from Stats Canada Labour Survey January 2015)

Unemployment dropped during this time period as well, by 0.1%. The employment growth was largely in women 55 and over, which might explain the part-time job part too (older employees being hired part-time to fill in gaps).

Unemployment Canada

Unemployment in Canada over last 5 years
(Courtesy Stats Canada Labour Force Survey January 2015)

There is one encouraging sentence in the report (for me):

The number of people employed in professional, scientific and technical services rose by 22,000 in January, the first notable increase since July 2013.

The other side of the coin is that there are a great deal less jobs in natural resources (and that will continue if Oil prices continue to stay low, but as we are seeing that is changing).

The Big Table

This month we look at jobs by age group and the percentage changes by month and year (I have altered the original table from Stats Canada, but you should check all this info out on their site).

Table 1
Labour force characteristics by age and sex – Seasonally adjusted

December
2014
January
2015
Std
error1

Dec 2014
to
Jan 2015

Jan 2014
to
Jan 2015

thousands (except rates)

% change

Both sexes, 15 years and over
Population 29,116.6 29,139.2 0.1 1.1

Labour force

19,127.7 19,148.4 29.4 0.1 0.3

Employment

17,851.5 17,886.9 28.8 0.2 0.7

Full-time

14,466.0 14,454.2 39.6 -0.1 0.8

Part-time

3,385.5 3,432.7 36.4 1.4 0.6

Unemployment

1,276.2 1,261.5 24.6 -1.2 -5.4
Participation rate 65.7 65.7 0.1
Unemployment rate 6.7 6.6 0.1
Employment rate 61.3 61.4 0.1
Part-time rate 19.0 19.2 0.2
Youths, 15 to 24 years
Population 4,455.0 4,451.4 -0.1 -0.9

Labour force

2,875.8 2,860.5 17.1 -0.5 0.2

Employment

2,488.9 2,495.6 15.7 0.3 1.2

Full-time

1,289.5 1,286.5 19.0 -0.2 2.1

Part-time

1,199.3 1,209.1 19.8 0.8 0.3

Unemployment

387.0 364.9 14.6 -5.7 -6.7
Participation rate 64.6 64.3 0.4
Unemployment rate 13.5 12.8 0.5
Employment rate 55.9 56.1 0.4
Part-time rate 48.2 48.4 0.7
Men, 25 years and over
Population 12,061.6 12,074.8 0.1 1.4

Labour force

8,631.7 8,636.1 15.5 0.1 0.5

Employment

8,143.5 8,137.5 16.5 -0.1 1.0

Full-time

7,502.2 7,455.4 22.3 -0.6 0.5

Part-time

641.3 682.1 18.4 6.4 6.8

Unemployment

488.2 498.6 14.5 2.1 -6.2
Participation rate 71.6 71.5 0.1
Unemployment rate 5.7 5.8 0.2
Employment rate 67.5 67.4 0.1
Part-time rate 7.9 8.4 0.2
Women, 25 years and over
Population 12,599.9 12,613.1 0.1 1.4

Labour force

7,620.2 7,651.7 16.7 0.4 0.1

Employment

7,219.2 7,253.7 16.3 0.5 0.3

Full-time

5,674.2 5,712.2 25.3 0.7 0.8

Part-time

1,544.9 1,541.5 24.0 -0.2 -1.8

Unemployment

401.0 398.0 13.4 -0.7 -3.0
Participation rate 60.5 60.7 0.1
Unemployment rate 5.3 5.2 0.2
Employment rate 57.3 57.5 0.1
Part-time rate 21.4 21.3 0.3

not applicable

1. Average standard error for change in two consecutive months. See “Sampling variability of estimates” in the section “About the Labour Force Survey” at the end of the publication Labour Force Information (Catalogue number71-001-X) for further explanations.

Note(s):

The sum of individual categories may not always add up to the total as a result of rounding.

Source(s):

CANSIM table 282-0087.

 

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