iPad Compatible Banking Apps

A while back I purchased an iPad for myself to see if I could “run” my small business (yes, this web site is a small business, stop snickering) on an iPad. I have learned a fair amount about the apps on the iPad and such, but I have also learned that for some odd reason many different apps only have iPhone compatible versions.

For those unfamiliar, you can run iPhone compatible apps on your iPad, however, they only run in Portrait Mode (short across top, longer on the side) and it looks pretty clunky (and most likely, if anything goes wrong, you are not going to get any customer support).

Apple iPad

Your New Banking Device ?

Whilst attempting to figure out how things work, I tripped across a couple of interesting issues with the Canadian Banks and their “apps”:

  • TD has an iPad compatible app, as does Tangerine bank, haven’t tested to see if the scan cheques capability works on either app
  • PC Financial, Capital One and Amex all have iPhone apps, but nothing that runs on an iPad, currently
  • For those of you curious this site is supposed to be iPad compatible too.

Having iPhone compatible apps is fun, and convenient, an iPad version with a few more features would help consumers more (although you would be banking over very unsafe WiFi networks).

How did I deal with this shortcoming? I tweeted about it (naturally):

Amazing stuff. Boomer and Echo pointed out that ten years ago I wouldn’t be making these complaints, but I had a retort for that as well:

No answers to my tweets (yet), aside from TD favoriting my comment about how their app did work with an iPad.

This was written on an iPad using Microsoft Word, and OneDisk to store it, which was then transferred to my web site, convoluted, but it works (for now).

Do you use your Tablet for on-line banking? How about your Smart Phone?

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World Autism Awareness Day

Today we celebrate an important day in my household, my daughter’s birthday. It is also World Autism Awareness Day or as we call it in my home, Thursday (depending on the year). Allow me to ramble a little on the topic (apologies for those looking for financial discussions, I’ll be back after the Easter Weekend). 

I have written a great deal about RDSPs (Registered Disability Savings Plans) and how key they are for parents of children with Autism, to help plan for their child’s future, and in there I have also written a few snippets about the life of a Parent with a child on the Autism Spectrum, but let me touch on a few more things to maybe help some folks have a better understanding of the challenges, for parents of kids on the spectrum.

I wrote a while ago about Giving Advice to parents of kids on the spectrum, and while that article was a little raw, it does sum up some of the problems Parents have (and I’d like to point out not just for parents of kids with Autism, parents of kids with disabilities (visible or not) and some parents in general have the same issues). I try to offer advice to parents I speak with, only if asked, but I must admit that sometimes I feel the need to share my “wisdom” on the subject a bit too much (so the finger points at me as well). I think all parents are trying as hard as they can, just try to support them, and you are helping.

Rhys is our last child, and I think that was a good thing, in that, we learned a great deal from our 3 daughters in terms of parenting skills, and a fair amount has been transferable to Rhys. All three girls were “gifted” in different ways, so we learned a great deal about how to deal with the educational system, and the problems getting smart kids a good education in the public system (also from my late Mother-in-Law who was in charge of the Learning Disabilities Association of Halton, and from my Parents, as my eldest brother has disabilities as well). From these experiences, and after talking to the local public schools, we decided to take on the extra financial burden of putting Rhys in a private school, because Rhys is unique in that he is very high functioning and thus doesn’t really fit into the “Classic” autism programs, but nor does he fit into the regular school programs. I wrote about getting Rhys’ school fees as a medical expense, so we get  a little help, but Mrs. C8j went back to work mostly to help out in this area as well (no one is complaining here, just explaining).

Keep in mind that marriages that have children on the spectrum have a higher risk of divorce (but I suspect this is also true for parents of kids with all disabilities), and at times there is stress in all relationships, but I think Mrs. C8j and I are doing fine in that aspect. 

Do I want my son “cured”? I am really not sure what “cured” would mean? He is an amazingly complex boy, with an ability to surprise you constantly, what am I curing him of?

  • Do I wish he could deal with social interactions better? Yes, but I was an incredibly awkward kid socially, it is just I was ludicrously extraverted (and obnoxious). Rhys is learning slowly about social interactions, I don’t know where this will lead.
  • Would I love to see him be able to go to “regular” school? Maybe, I don’t really know, “regular” school never did me any big favors, it was only when I went to University that I started to realize my own gifts.
  • Is the world a better place with my son in it? Absolutely, Yes

So why would I want him “cured”? Please remember we are lucky that Rhys is high functioning, in that he talks, walks and if you saw him you really wouldn’t notice anything (except that he is only 10 but the size of a 14-year-old, but I suspect that is genetics). I have friends and have met folks who have children with Severe Autism, and I think they would give anything to have a child like Rhys, and their definition of “cured” would be different from mine.

In my life I am blessed with many things, and my children are my biggest blessing (and my wife, family and friends as well).

 

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Active Investors Fight Back

At an undisclosed “family eatery” in Ottawa an argument broke out between warring factions of the Financial Blogging world, when Active Investors felt they had been pushed over the edge and fought back against the “… oppressive no fun antics of passive investors…”. What was supposed to be a civil discussion about current events and economic trends dissolved into a “Pier 6 Donny Brook”, when the subject of whether Active Investors could “beat the market” consistently.

One combatant stated, “I have had enough of all this, invest carefully, and grow your wealth safely stuff that is being espoused.  Did Buffett passive invest? Did JP Morgan? Did my Uncle Ralph? NO! they bought individual stocks and they got filthy stinking rich!”.

The staff at the local “watering hole” were taken aback by the antics of these alleged “Money Experts” and their crude commentaries such as:

  • “… active investors calculate their growth using slide rules!”
  • “… passive investors drive below the speed limit on the highway because they are satisfied not using the full speed potential!”
  • “… why would anyone not want to have the exhilaration of buying high and selling low?”
  • “… you need to lose money to make money”
  • “… passive investing is for losers who just can’t make a decision!”

And many other comments that cannot be included as they are far too crude in nature.

April Fools Alert!

Well part of the story is true, the N.C.F.B.A. did have a lovely dinner.

April Fools!

 

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Student Lines of Credit

For my regular readers you will remember that I have a deal with my children, that I will attempt to pay for their first degree, in exchange I will not pay for their wedding ceremony, with the proviso that if I am asked to help out on the wedding (which I will do, I am not as heartless as I’d like to think I am), it is my party as well.  A follow on proviso is that they pay for any future degrees (although I will attempt to help out if it is possible).

With this in mind, my middle daughter decided to go to Chiropractic College, and applied for a Student Line of Credit. Most of the big banks, either:

  • Don’t offer very much money which is a problem as Chiropractic College is a very expensive degree
  • Weren’t interested in dealing with her
National Bank of Canada

National Bank of Canada

This led to going to the National Bank of Canada, which does offer a Student Line of Credit family of loans. The amount they will loan depends on what program you are in, and they view Chiropractic College as a “health care professional” program thus they will loan her enough money to cover most of her expenses (mind  you the degree is even more expensive, because she has to “live” in Toronto, which is not cheap). The nice part of their Student Line of Credit is , “…no payback of principal (sic) or interest while you are at school…”, which is useful.

My daughter thought she had set up one of these fine life sucking debt creatures (no I am not going soft on debt, I still hate it), however, she was mistaken. I ended up having to co-sign on her application (so really it’s my student line of credit), and this is why I am not happy (as well).

My daughter has been getting calls from the bank since she had the Line of Credit set up, and the problem kept getting “cleared up” (or more precisely it went away). Finally, this past week, luckily she was home, she got another call, and she went back to the National Bank branch where she set everything up, and she finally got to the heart of the problem, which was, they had not set it up a Student Line of Credit at all, they had set it up as a “regular” line of credit, and they were kind of miffed that she was not paying her minimum payments.

I was not present when all of this silliness transpired, but my daughter worked hard to start straightening the mess up. The young lady she spoke to first, was smart enough to figure out that she was out of her depth, and the  young man (who was lucky enough to be working on a Saturday) she dragged into the mess started to peel this smelly onion of a problem. He was the lucky one to figure out that the “Student Line of Credit” was set up as a regular “Line of Credit” and then realized the Pickle of a Predicament this created.

Evidently someone from “Head Office” will need to clean up the mess created by the  young lady who made the blunder setting things up initially, but the young man from the branch has triggered the Hazardous Debt cleanup team that will work on this problem (I hope).

Why does this all matter to me? First, I am very proud that my daughter dealt with all of this without my intervention. The important point for me, is that whatever Credit Rating penalties that might come out of this blunder, is going to be mine, because I am the co-signer on this debt vehicle, so the National Bank will soon get to enjoy the special treatment I have given TD over the years, stay tuned, this looks like it is going to be an interesting follow up.

The moral of this story? (even though it is not finished yet)?

  • Always follow-up with your bank when you set up a new account with the bank to make sure it is set up correctly. I have had Spousal RRSPs that were set up as regular RRSPs more than once, so follow up every time.
  • Careful what loans you co-sign for, they can end up hurting your credit rating
  • I still hate debt, and now I have another reason to hate debt.

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Death of EPost, More Madness, and #BestMoneyStories

It does look like Canada Post’s Epost service is falling out of favor with some of their customers. I got a note from Bell stating that my bill will no longer be sent to Epost and that I should go to the Bell web site to get my bill. Bell would be a large client for Canada Post, wonder if other services are thinking of abandoning the service? I don’t really have a high opinion of the service, given I cannot attach it to Outlook or other E-mail readers (just as background).

Ant Eater

Another one of my favorite Ant Eaters actually an Aardvark (from the Pink Panther animated series)

Brackets have been obliterated by a few well timed upset at the March Madness Tournament, which is what makes the event that much more interesting. The win and go on, lose and go home format is conducive to some unpredictable results. I was sad to see that the Buffett Bracket was not happening this year due to legal entanglements. The Buffett bracket is the Wizard of Omaha offering a lot of money for anyone who can have a perfect bracket during March Madness. The chances of that is:

To calculate the total number of ways to fill out a bracket take the total number of possible outcomes for each game (2) and multiply it out 63 times: 2 x 2 x 2….x 2, or 2^63. The odds come in at one in over nine quintillion – odds that don’t seem very promising.

And my favorite team at March Madness? The UC Irvine Ant Eaters with their 7’6″ Center  Mamadou Ndiaye, great team name and a mountain in the middle, wow.

Do you have your taxes done? It is time to get it done, no time to lose on this important task.  It’s also Palm Sunday this weekend, so if you were thinking of going back to Church, might want to start this week, and beat the Easter rush.

Get $50 in free trades.

My Writings for Week Ending March 7th

Only in Ottawa would you have folks so excited about a hockey game that they throw hamburgers to celebrate (and the players eat them):

  • So my First Real Post from 10 Years ago, was more of a warning for the folks who might read my ideas, not to follow the advice, and please don’t sue me for that advice or opinions.
  • So the Best Financial Decision Ever that I made, I was worried might be the biggest blunder I might have ever made, but luckily it ended up working out quite well for me and my family.
  • Over on LinkedIn I updated an older story back from when I was hunting for a new job Your Facebook Page IS Your New Reference, and it is still very true today, many employers do extensive Internet searches on candidates. Another good Linked in article written by a friend is the Courage to Coach.

Click here for many more great financial stories

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