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Vaccines, Here Comes Christmas and #MoneyTalk

in Best of, COVID19, Pandemic, Random Thoughts, Stats Canada

Looks like we have a vaccine story, so I guess the answer to “COVID are we f*cked?“, is, “Not so much, but not great yet“. There are multiple vaccines, and as usual some interesting issues. The reactions from allergic folks shouldn’t be too surprising. Does this mean the end is near? Not quite yet, my guess is we have a pretty dire Winter ahead, but things are looking better.

How can the government afford all this spending? Old folks like me quibble about the National Debt, but evidently Modern Monetary Theory suggests, Government Debt doesn’t matter. I don’t agree, but we shall see, maybe I am wrong (again).

If you received CERB, you might be getting a note from the CRA asking for the money back. There was some interesting wordsmith work done, which changed the context of eligibility.

Nice to see the prime rates at the banks are steady, however, given their “High Interest Savings Accounts” are mostly pay 0.1% or lower, doesn’t mean much to me. EQ bank seems to be paying a bit more, at 1.5% currently (see ads on this site).

Inflation (year over year October 2020) 0.7%
Bank of Canada Overnight Rate November 17th 0.25%
Unemployment Rate (as of November 2020)8.5%
Real GDP By Expenditure (Q3 2020)(quarterly change)8.9%
Population of Canada (Est July 1, 2020)38,005,238
CIBC current prime rate2.45%
BMO current prime rate2.45%
Scotiabank prime lending rate2.45%
TD prime lending rate2.45%
Tangerine prime lending rate2.45%
Some Useful Financial Data for Canadians as of December 12th

COVID19 Data Canada

Click here to find an up to date graphic from the Government of Canada

Total Cases442,069
Total Deaths13,109
Data as of December 10th 2020

Past Writings

Here comes Christmas at a break neck pace. Going to be a very different celebration, given the lockdowns going on. Haven’t done one of these posts in a while, it seems:

  • I got absolutely no comments on I Likes My Coffees Like I Likes My Money, which leaves me scratching my head. I figured someone would post a snarky comment or something, or rail at me about my last comment about women, but nothing. Maybe all my “readers” are actually just me?
  • When to Put Money in RRSP is a very good question, luckily I created a diagram, that a bunch of trolls said, “That is not a waterfall”. You get what I mean though.
  • Free Credit Bureau Access sounds like a great deal, however, as before free comes with costs. Thanks to having Desjardins accounts, I am now worse for wear. I NEED credit bureau access (for 5 years no less).
  • Convenience always has a cost, and The Dangers of Automatic Reloading outlines that cost.
  • The Hidden Cost of Land Transfer Taxes I wrote about this before, but somehow managed to resurrect the topic again. Land transfer taxes are rarely mentioned as part of your Real Estate costs, but they do add up.
  • How to Open a Kids Bank Account in the time of COVID is more complicated than you might think. It worked, but I wish I’d been able to use one of the on-line banks. Kids accounts are not usually part of their portfolio.
  • Specified Disability Savings Plan – SDSP – How Does it Work ? This is an important way that someone who is going to die in the next 5 years can take money out of their RDSP. Yes, the RDSP is complicated, but still a great very long-term savings option, for the disabled.
  • If you make a credit card payment late, there is a Credit Card: One Time Services that you can ask for. You can’t do it very often, and you better have been paying off your cards regularly.
  • The Government has finally gotten around to cleaning up the question RDSP after DTC Lost question. Naturally the response is complicated, but the account no longer needs to be collapsed within a year of losing the DTC. The assumption is that the person with the disability most likely will get their Disability Tax Credit back (in time).

EQ Bank Savings Plus Account

Christmas is coming, but do we care?

Given many parts of Canada are going to be under lockdown over Christmas, how will we celebrate? Hopefully in a more sedate fashion? I ask that you follow your local authorities rules about congregating together.


Tweets of the Past While

This is so truly English. The gentleman’s biggest complaint about getting the Vaccine? He couldn’t find parking so he was late!

Can he be any more English?

He isn’t wrong

What do you do with a 3 stories tall Grinch? Save Christmas, that is for sure!

The Grinch Saves Christmas Again

Random Thoughts from the Past

{ 4 comments }

  • SusanSusan December 17, 2020, 6:41 PM

    Maybe all my “readers” are actually just me?

    Well apparently there’s me and one other guy 😂

    Reply
  • smayer97 December 14, 2020, 12:18 PM

    BTW, if you are interested in tracking HISA, TFSA, GIC, etc rates, check out this site:
    https://www.highinterestsavings.ca/

    There you can see Canadian Tire offers 1.8% on HISA. And currently EQ offers 2.3% on TFSA and RRSP and 2.5% on 3-month GIC.

    Reply
  • smayer97 December 14, 2020, 12:06 PM

    So what happened to my post?

    Reply
  • smayer97 December 11, 2020, 8:33 PM

    Who needs a vaccine for a disease that more than 99.5% of people survive, the vast majority without any intervention?
    – Where the average age of death is 82, compared to the average age of death for all other conditions combined is, wait for it…..also 82;
    – where over 94% of deaths are among those with pre-existing conditions;
    – And where over 80% of deaths are still in long term care facilities, meaning less than 20% is in the population at large, or about 2600 in all of Canada in 10 months, or 260 per MONTH
    – contrast that with almost 800 people dying every single DAY in Canada, and yet strangely the net excess death year over year has hardly budged for the entire year; in other words, NOT equal to the number deaths attributed to COVID; in other words, where are the deaths from all the other typical killers? That is the “pandemic” we are facing.

    So for all that, let’s see what we get with these new vaccines:
    – use such new technology never before tried before
    – previous ones never successfully made before because vaccines for coronaviruses have been fraught with challenges for decades
    – were rushed to market in only 9 months with no animal studies, skipped certain types of human studies, and no long-term impact studies, which normally take years… this includes not knowing the impact on the potential of developing the disease and the risk of decreasing immunity against OTHER diseases, just to name a couple of key issues
    – as you point out, challenges those with severe and deadly allergic reactions (and there are MANY out there), that places are having to set up resuscitation services in conjunction with administering the vaccines. (You have a child with autism, I have 3, and 2 plus my wife with other genetic defects and sensory issues…that’s 4 out of 5 of us)
    – there are concerns for pregnant women, those seeking to get pregnant, or breastfeeding women because of concerns of birth defects or defects in infants
    – were not tested on the most vulnerable populations with pre-existing conditions, on the elderly, or on children
    – where an AI technology has been deployed just to keep track of all the expected vaccine injuries from these new never-tested before vaccines
    – where a vaccine injury compensation programme has finally been created in Canada (the last of the G7 to actually have one in place; and why would you need one if they are so safe?); the reason these programmes and courts are needed is because vaccine manufacturers have been granted immunity from any liability since 1986
    – and statements by the manufacturers and health professionals (including Dr. Fauci) that clearly indicate that they do not know that these will prevent infection but may only prevent symptoms, potentially turning everyone into Typhoid Mary’s.

    So where do I sign up?

    Anyway, as for debt, I’m with you…I’m no economist (as if they have a handle on this) but somewhere along the line this will likely have an impact, unless there is a great reset of assets and debts or some form of debt restructuring.

    As for prime rate, EQ is now offering TFSA and RRSPs at a 2.3% rate and Canadian Tire has an HISA for 1.8%.

    Reply

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