EQ Bank Savings Plus Account

More RDSP Talk

A while ago I spoke with Tom Drake at Maple Money about the DTC and RDSP. After some judicious edit’ing Tom has published the Podcast here. As usual you can read about the RDSP on my Registered Disability Savings Plan page.

For those unaware there are a bunch of very smart folks that I use for research on this topic (my wife being a major contributor), and whenever I do one of these talks, I get a few things not quite right (and this is no difference). My source at ESDC (who is very patient and kind) points out a few of my fumbles: I mention that the program is 10 years old, it was started in 2008, so that is a 12 years in 2020.

RDSP and Bankruptcy

Doug Hoyes and I have discussed (on his Podcast) about the topic of RDSPs and bankruptcy, but my source now states clearly:

“The Bankruptcy Act was changed last year through the Budget Implementation Act.‎ See 67(1)(b.3) of the Insolvency and Bankruptcy Act.”

ESDC Source

134 Paragraph 67(1)‍(b.‍3) of the Act is replaced by the following:(b.‍3) without restricting the generality of paragraph (b), property in a registered retirement savings plan, a registered retirement income fund or a registered disability savings plan, as those expressions are defined in the Income Tax Act, or in any prescribed plan, other than property contributed to any such plan or fund in the 12 months before the date of bankruptcy,

Bill C-97

RDSP After DTC Lost

If the beneficiary loses their Disability Tax Credit (DTC), it used to be that the RDSP had to be closed. I waffled around this one with Tom, but the actual answer is:

“As of Budget day 2019, a RDSP n‎o longer is required to be closed due to loss of DTC. During a period when the beneficiary in not DTC eligible no contributions can be made to the plan except for the rollover of funds from a RRSP of a deceased parent or grandparent upon whom the beneficiary was dependent.  During a period of DTC eligibility, the beneficiary will not accumulate annual grant or bond entitlements. The Assistance Holdback Amount will be determined as the ten year period immediately prior to the beneficiary being DTC ineligible, and will remain that period until the end of the year the beneficiary turns 50. Each subsequent year the AHA will decrease by a year. (51-9 years, 52-8 years,… 59-1 year). The year the beneficiary turns 60, the AHA is nil. Should the benficiary requalify for the DTC, the plan will operate as normal.”

ESDC Source

So the money hangs around until the person turns 60 and then can be withdrawn, as Tom Drake pointed out should be the case.

Each time I talk about the Registered Disability Savings Plan and DTC I end up learning more myself.


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My CRA Account

One of the most important things you can have is have a My CRA on-line account with the Tax Folks. How do you do that?

Straight forward

Go to this web site to start the process: CRA Log In Registration Site . Note you will need a copy of last years Tax return to verify you are who you are. Once you register, you wait, because the CRA will then send via Canada Post your log in credentials.

Yes, this is cumbersome, but also very important. This variation on 2 stage verification is important to ensure no scurrilous nasty folk get at your CRA data. Even in troubled times, security is very important.

Once this letter shows up follow the instructions and log in. After logging in once, you can then put that information somewhere very secure, and forget about it. Why? Your Bank access for online banking can be used (for most of us) as our log in after that.

Why Get it?

Why is My CRA so good to have? Here are a few things you can get there:

  • Your TFSA limit for this year. This is calculated at the start of the year, so if you have already deposited money into it, you’ll have to take that into consideration.
  • Your RRSP limit for the year. See the TFSA for the same cautions about the data.
  • The Status of your Tax Return or Appeal. I have found this invaluable with my many reviews and such. Typically the CRA will tell you if you have email to deal with from them as well.
  • Emails from the CRA about your return, or appeal. This is the only way the CRA will contact you, and it will tell you to check My CRA, without any link. They won’t ask for iTunes cards either.
  • Usually you can download your Tax data into Turbotax and other Tax Prep software, which makes life infinitely easier. I used that this year, very useful.
  • Lots of other stuff too.

If you are an on-line person, get this access now, it will make your life much simpler.

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CRA and me: Assessment Excitement

The summer of 2018, the CRA sent me a letter of assessment for my son’s school fees. These kind of assessments happen often. While I am slightly freaked out by them, it is still not a big deal. The letter asked for all associated documentation supporting my medical claim for my son’s school fees.

I dutifully collected all the receipts for the School and for my son’s Occupational Therapist. I wrote a cover letter outlining what I was sending and I sent it via registered mail to the CRA.

In that previous paragraph I made two mistakes (one small and one critical error):

  1. I could have easily scanned all the receipts and submitted them to the CRA on line. Much faster, and less expensive. Hopefully I will remember that for the next time.
  2. The letter asked for all associated documentation, and I misinterpreted that to mean receipts, and that caused a big problem.

 For those unaware, if your child is disabled you can claim their schooling or training as a medical expense. You must have a DTC first, and then ask permission of the CRA to be able to make that claim on your taxes. This is where my blunder took place.

My son had changed schools a while back, and I had never done a new letter outlining how his new school would help him with his disability (Autism Spectrum). Without this letter, and supporting documentation from his Doctor and other medical professionals, the CRA had every right to deny this claim on my taxes. As I did not include any supporting documentation with my assessment, the CRA denied my claim, and sent me a bill for what I owed.

The CRA was in the right to do this, and I was in the wrong for not sending it. I want to be clear on this point, I am not casting any shade on the CRA, they have actually been very helpful in this case.

It took a while, but I finally received my Assessment response via email, and I was shocked and upset to see the results(an over $4000 tax bill). After reading the email a few times, my wife read it and pointed out my mistake. She realized that I had not sent a new package outlining how the new school helped my son. I believe I sputtered and swore, but then came to the epiphany that my wife was right.

The past few weeks I have spent collecting the needed data and letters to support my claim for my son’s school expenses, and submitted them (electronically) to the CRA.

As the date of when I was supposed to pay my new tax bill came closer, I realized my reassessment was not going to be completed in time. Again, this was due to my procrastination, not the CRA inaction. I decided to call the CRA, and they directed me to their collections group.

When I spoke to the collections person, he brought up my file, I explained that I had submitted the needed documentation, and they decided to give me a 90-day extension on my due payment. This means I won’t have to fork out $4000 at Christmas time.

There is no guarantee that the CRA will accept my claim and documentation. Given the amount of supporting documentation I am hopeful that this is sufficient, but at least I won’t have to pay out a large sum of money now (that might be refunded later).

Conclusion

As I have said previously, if you don’t ask the answer is always no. I asked the CRA for clarification on what they needed, they provided that to me. The CRA also granted me an extension on payment, because I asked, and had a good set of reasons.

Sometimes the CRA screws up, but in this case, they are actually the heroes in this story (so far).

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Notice of Determination on Disability Tax Credit

About three weeks ago we mailed in (via certified mail, so we got a tracking ID for the envelope we sent to the CRA) our re-application for the disability tax credit certificate (DTC) for my son. We were not really sure how long it was going to take to receive the notice of determination. Yesterday we received the response about our son’s eligibility for the DTC.

We sent enough, and the correct information, as the CRA completed their review and now my son is eligible for another 8 years (until he turns 18), and his DTCC was extended (i.e. a positive response in the notice of determination), which is a relief to us. This means we can continue to receive the child tax benefits, and also continue to contribute to his Registered Disability Savings Plan (RDSP) as well.

Can the disability tax credit be backdated? For us, backdating was granted, as Autism is viewed as a brain stem injury, and thus from birth. We asked for this in our application letter.

The notice of determination for the DTC from the CRA is very clear but it has two very interesting paragraphs:

You will have to file a new, full completed Form T2201, Disability Tax Credit Certificate, for the 2024 tax year or earlier if we ask for one, so we can review your son’s eligibility for DTC.

In the meantime, if your dependant’s medical condition improves to the point that the impairment would not longer meet the eligibility criteria for disability tax credit, you must let us know.

Interesting how the CRA can still ask for an updated T2201 at any time, if they wish to review my son’s eligibility, and that I must tell them if he is no longer impaired ? Autism Spectrum isn’t cured, but I guess this is the CRA being thorough ?

Final Bits to Notice

Another interesting stanza in the notice of determination states:

Please note that you are responsible for any fees charged by a medical practitioner to complete Form 2201, Disability Tax Credit Certificate, or to provide us with additional information. These fees are medical expenses. See line 330 of the General Income Tax and Benefit Guide

In our case we did have to pay for the Speech Pathologist Report, which was included in the documentation sent to the CRA, so that is now a medical expense (remember other things can be a medical expense as well).

A final helpful section stated:

If you need more information about the Registered Disability Savings Plan (RDSP), please see the additional RDSP information sheet.

Yes, there was a helpful sheet about RDSPs included with the letter. It suggested checking out the Employment and Social Development Canada (ESDC) web site, which is helpful as well. It also pointed out that the Government may deposit up to $90,000 into the RDSP over the lifetime of the beneficiary (another good reason to have one). ESDC is on Twitter too.

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Direct Deposit Enrolment for Government Benefits

Government Cheques will be going away ( very soon), and you can easily sign up for direct deposit, if you can remember your on-line banking.

Life of a Government Cheque

Journey of a Government Cheque

How hard is it? Let’s just walk through it for you.

First question to answer is, do you receive Government Cheques for any reason? You sure? Check this web page which has a list of all the different folks that can send you cheques, which include:

You sure you don’t receive any of these?

How To Do It

Next, congratulations! You have figured out you need to set up direct deposit (the first step to solving any problem is admitting you have a problem). How can you fix this? Click on any of those links above and you will be told how, however, let’s try a different way of doing things, let’s go to the CRA and check out how your Tax Refund might be done.

  1. Go to your CRA MyAccount page  (link on that page). What the hell is a MyAccount? Don’t worry, you don’t need to create one, you can simply log in with your On-Line Banking credentials (if you don’t have on-line banking I would strongly suggest going to a Services Canada Office to set things up).
  2. Log into CRA My Account with your on-line banking credentials
  3. If you have done things right you will then be at a home page that will have many different and wonderful things you can do with the CRA. Select the Accounts and Payment tab
  4. Voila here is where you set up your direct deposit, or alter it so that it goes to a different account, or stop it from being deposited (although why you would do that I do not know).

It is just that simple people, so why haven’t you set it up yet? Get off your duff and do it!

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