in Stats Canada, Unemployment

Stats Canada pointed out that the Canadian Economy (in terms of folks working and jobs) is treading water and not getting any worse, but not flourishing either, in their report Labour Force Survey for July 2015 published this past Friday.

The story is a little more heartening if you look at the year over year numbers:

Compared with 12 months earlier, employment increased by 161,000 or 0.9%, the result of more full-time work. Over the same period, the total number of hours worked rose 1.2%.

I am confident, that if I was a Tory candidate I would quote that part of the report, however, if I was in the opposition I’d point out how stagnant job creation has become month over month (“… nice hair though…”).

Employment Graph

Employment Graph Since 2010 
CANSIM table 282-0087.

 

You can see the leveling off in the graph, for the past little while.

Last week in my best of post Cheap Gold, Cheap Oil, Weak Dollar, Election Week 1 and #BestMoneyStories, I ranted about how commodities and oil price dropping is hurting the west and that is well highlighted in this report:

Despite little change in the level of employment in Alberta, the unemployment rate increased by 0.3 percentage points to 6.0% in July as more people searched for work. Since January, the unemployment rate in the province has increased by 1.5 percentage points.

This is a telling statement, with job losses in Manitoba and Saskatchewan as well, whereas Ontario and Quebec there are “more” jobs (see the table at the end of this post for more details).

It will be hard to argue this is good news (on the election front), but it isn’t disastrous news (although it is not very good news out west).

Unemployment Graph (rate)

Unemployment Graph since 2010 CANSIM table 282-0087.

The Big Table

As I mentioned let us look at this, province by province.

June
2015
July
2015
Std
error1
June to
July 2015
July 2014
to July 2015
thousands (except rates)thousands (except rates)thousands (except
rates)
change in thousands
(except
rates)
change in
thousands (except
rates)
Newfoundland and Labrador
Population442.8442.5-0.3-1.3
Labour force270.5268.32.0-2.2-1.7
Employment237.1236.52.1-0.6-1.3
Full-time204.4205.52.71.15.9
Part-time32.731.02.1-1.7-7.2
Unemployment33.431.82.0-1.6-0.4
Participation rate61.160.60.5-0.5-0.2
Unemployment rate12.311.90.7-0.40.0
Employment rate53.553.40.5-0.1-0.2
Prince Edward Island
Population120.9120.90.00.2
Labour force82.181.70.6-0.40.0
Employment73.072.20.6-0.8-1.9
Full-time59.959.70.9-0.2-2.3
Part-time13.212.50.7-0.70.3
Unemployment9.19.50.60.41.9
Participation rate67.967.60.5-0.3-0.1
Unemployment rate11.111.60.70.52.3
Employment rate60.459.70.5-0.7-1.7
Nova Scotia
Population785.2785.80.63.0
Labour force485.0489.32.64.3-3.3
Employment446.4449.52.73.13.8
Full-time364.2369.43.85.27.6
Part-time82.280.13.3-2.1-3.8
Unemployment38.739.82.41.1-7.1
Participation rate61.862.30.30.5-0.6
Unemployment rate8.08.10.50.1-1.4
Employment rate56.957.20.30.30.3
New Brunswick
Population621.9621.90.00.5
Labour force390.5390.42.2-0.10.4
Employment348.2347.52.3-0.7-3.7
Full-time293.2297.73.14.54.2
Part-time55.049.82.7-5.2-7.9
Unemployment42.242.92.10.74.0
Participation rate62.862.80.40.00.0
Unemployment rate10.811.00.50.21.0
Employment rate56.055.90.4-0.1-0.6
Quebec
Population6,841.56,845.13.639.0
Labour force4,429.54,438.514.89.027.7
Employment4,075.54,097.214.821.743.7
Full-time3,294.13,297.421.43.357.1
Part-time781.4799.819.618.4-13.3
Unemployment354.0341.313.2-12.7-16.1
Participation rate64.764.80.20.10.0
Unemployment rate8.07.70.3-0.3-0.4
Employment rate59.659.90.20.30.3
Ontario
Population11,378.111,390.412.3113.4
Labour force7,426.07,424.119.7-1.9-11.5
Employment6,945.76,945.719.60.067.4
Full-time5,647.05,642.428.3-4.6131.0
Part-time1,298.71,303.425.64.7-63.5
Unemployment480.3478.416.9-1.9-78.9
Participation rate65.365.20.2-0.1-0.7
Unemployment rate6.56.40.2-0.1-1.1
Employment rate61.061.00.20.00.0
Manitoba
Population986.4987.61.210.1
Labour force671.8669.72.5-2.18.9
Employment636.1632.32.5-3.86.0
Full-time512.1509.73.8-2.49.3
Part-time124.1122.63.6-1.5-3.3
Unemployment35.737.42.11.72.9
Participation rate68.167.80.3-0.30.2
Unemployment rate5.35.60.30.30.4
Employment rate64.564.00.3-0.5-0.1
Saskatchewan
Population861.1861.90.88.7
Labour force604.7599.62.6-5.18.8
Employment576.1568.72.7-7.4-2.7
Full-time474.8464.63.7-10.2-10.3
Part-time101.4104.23.42.87.7
Unemployment28.630.92.02.311.5
Participation rate70.269.60.3-0.60.4
Unemployment rate4.75.20.30.51.9
Employment rate66.966.00.3-0.9-1.0
Alberta
Population3,354.03,360.46.471.1
Labour force2,441.52,446.110.04.661.0
Employment2,302.52,298.210.2-4.321.0
Full-time1,918.91,920.514.21.623.1
Part-time383.6377.712.7-5.9-2.1
Unemployment139.1147.87.98.739.9
Participation rate72.872.80.30.00.3
Unemployment rate5.76.00.30.31.5
Employment rate68.668.40.3-0.2-0.8
British Columbia
Population3,874.43,879.55.147.0
Labour force2,449.52,452.310.12.828.4
Employment2,306.62,306.010.1-0.628.9
Full-time1,834.11,818.414.9-15.729.9
Part-time472.5487.714.415.2-0.8
Unemployment142.9146.28.23.3-0.7
Participation rate63.263.20.30.00.0
Unemployment rate5.86.00.30.2-0.1
Employment rate59.559.40.3-0.10.0

not applicable

Note(s):

The sum of individual categories may not always add up to the total as a result of rounding.

Source(s):

CANSIM table 282-0087.

 

Job Reports from 2015

So far here are the employment reports on this site:

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