Jobs ? in Canada in December ?

The story of jobs from November to December in 2014 was an odd mix, where there are a few less jobs, but there are more full-time folks, so a mixed bag of news. The real number is 4300 less jobs from November to December, but, if you look at the year over year numbers, there are 186,000 more jobs than last year at this time (and a lot of that growth is in the second half of 2014), so good news there.

The graph for employment reflects the “meh..” aspect to the numbers from last month:

Employment in Canada Past 5 years

Employment Graph for Past 5 years

As usual, the enigmatic unemployment rate remained unchanged, but what does that mean?

Unemployment in Canada for past 5 years

Unemployment for Past 5 years

We created 54,000 full-time jobs and lost 58,000 part-time jobs? Two edged sword, bad to lose jobs, good that we have more full-time jobs. Not good news for women over 25, let’s hope that gets remedied soon too.

Labour force characteristics by age and sex – Seasonally adjusted

I have edit’ed the table a little for readability on this site, you want the full picture, check it out on the Stats Canada web site.

November
2014
December
2014
Std err1 Nov to Dec 2014 Dec 2013 to Dec 2014
thousands (except rates) change in thousands (except rates)
Both sexes, 15 years and over
Population 29,165.9 29,190.0 24.1 346.3
Labour force 19,236.6 19,225.4 29.1 -11.2 74.0
Employment 17,957.9 17,953.6 28.9 -4.3 185.7
Full-time 14,511.0 14,564.5 39.2 53.5 190.3
Part-time 3,446.9 3,389.2 36.1 -57.7 -4.5
Unemployment 1,278.6 1,271.8 24.9 -6.8 -111.7
Participation rate 66.0 65.9 0.1 -0.1 -0.5
Unemployment rate 6.6 6.6 0.1 0.0 -0.6
Employment rate 61.6 61.5 0.1 -0.1 -0.1
Part-time rate 19.2 18.9 0.2 -0.3 -0.2
Youths, 15 to 24 years
Population 4,403.2 4,399.9 -3.3 -40.0
Labour force 2,860.2 2,866.7 17.2 6.5 50.6
Employment 2,487.7 2,484.4 15.8 -3.3 62.5
Full-time 1,258.2 1,293.0 18.6 34.8 43.6
Part-time 1,229.5 1,191.5 19.7 -38.0 19.0
Unemployment 372.6 382.3 14.6 9.7 -12.0
Participation rate 65.0 65.2 0.4 0.2 1.8
Unemployment rate 13.0 13.3 0.5 0.3 -0.7
Employment rate 56.5 56.5 0.4 0.0 2.0
Part-time rate 49.4 48.0 0.7 -1.5 -0.5
Men, 25 years and over
Population 12,132.3 12,145.8 13.5 194.6
Labour force 8,688.8 8,702.6 15.1 13.8 64.4
Employment 8,182.9 8,209.7 16.4 26.8 127.4
Full-time 7,541.9 7,560.0 22.0 18.1 118.9
Part-time 641.0 649.8 18.0 8.8 8.6
Unemployment 506.0 492.9 14.5 -13.1 -62.9
Participation rate 71.6 71.7 0.1 0.1 -0.6
Unemployment rate 5.8 5.7 0.2 -0.1 -0.7
Employment rate 67.4 67.6 0.1 0.2 0.0
Part-time rate 7.8 7.9 0.2 0.1 0.0
Women, 25 years and over
Population 12,630.4 12,644.4 14.0 191.8
Labour force 7,687.5 7,656.1 16.6 -31.4 -41.0
Employment 7,287.4 7,259.5 16.4 -27.9 -4.3
Full-time 5,711.0 5,711.6 25.7 0.6 27.9
Part-time 1,576.5 1,547.9 24.0 -28.6 -32.2
Unemployment 400.1 396.6 13.3 -3.5 -36.7
Participation rate 60.9 60.5 0.1 -0.4 -1.3
Unemployment rate 5.2 5.2 0.2 0.0 -0.4
Employment rate 57.7 57.4 0.1 -0.3 -0.9
Part-time rate 21.6 21.3 0.3 -0.3 -0.4

1. Average standard error for change in two consecutive months. See “Sampling variability of estimates” in the section “About the Labour Force Survey” at the end of the publication Labour Force Information (Catalogue number71-001-X) for further explanations.

Note(s):

The sum of individual categories may not always add up to the total as a result of rounding.

Source(s):

CANSIM table 282-0087.

 

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Unemployment Creeps Up for November

Stats Canada came out with their Labour Force Survey on Friday, and had a lump of coal for the festive season with a reported increase in Unemployment from 6.5% to 6.6% (in November (in Canada)).

The year over year employment story is much better (but don’t ever mistake employment news and unemployment news, as they are measured quite differently).

Compared with November 2013, employment increased by 146,000 (+0.8%), with part-time and full-time work up 1.9% and 0.6% respectively. Over the same period, the total number of hours worked was little changed (+0.1%).

Don’t let that rosy sounding news fool you though, there are more folks unemployed, and in the following graph you can see the employment “dip” (as it were).

Employment For the Past 5 Years

For older folk such as myself the employment picture is less happy, with less jobs for men aged 55 and over, as well less jobs overall in Retail and Scientific and Technical services (all in all not good news for old geeks like me).

The unemployment saw tooth graph continues on with many ups and downs (but an overall downward trend).

Unemployment in Canada Past 5 Years

Seasonally Adjusted Unemployment For Past 5 Years

The seasonally adjusted unemployment rate while a little higher is still much better than it was last year at this time. In Ontario overall there were 34,000 less jobs last month.

Employment by Class of Worker

As usual I include one of the larger data tables, for your perusal and enjoyment.

Employment by class of worker and industry (based on NAICS1) – Seasonally adjusted

Oct
2014
Nov
2014
Std
err2
Oct to Nov
2014
Nov 2013
to Nov 2014
Oct to
Nov
2014
Nov
2013
to
Nov
2014
thousands change in thousands % change
Class of worker

Employees

15,243.2 15,220.2 35.7 -23.0 107.0 -0.2 0.7

Self-employed

2,725.4 2,737.7 25.5 12.3 39.1 0.5 1.4
Public/private sector employees

Public

3,628.2 3,650.8 25.0 22.6 45.2 0.6 1.3

Private

11,615.0 11,569.4 37.9 -45.6 61.8 -0.4 0.5
All industries 17,968.6 17,957.9 28.9 -10.7 146.0 -0.1 0.8
Goods-producing sector 3,915.5 3,932.8 26.3 17.3 30.8 0.4 0.8
Agriculture 297.1 305.1 7.5 8.0 -2.7 2.7 -0.9
Natural resources3 357.7 372.5 7.4 14.8 -10.5 4.1 -2.7
Utilities 152.1 152.6 5.4 0.5 -2.8 0.3 -1.8
Construction 1,355.8 1,350.5 17.7 -5.3 37.3 -0.4 2.8
Manufacturing 1,752.7 1,752.3 19.6 -0.4 9.7 0.0 0.6
Services-producing sector 14,053.1 14,025.1 34.4 -28.0 115.3 -0.2 0.8
Trade 2,738.9 2,697.3 24.5 -41.6 -2.5 -1.5 -0.1
Transportation and warehousing 886.7 872.4 14.2 -14.3 0.8 -1.6 0.1
Finance, insurance, real estate and leasing 1,144.3 1,155.6 16.8 11.3 23.0 1.0 2.0
Professional, scientific and technical services 1,380.1 1,347.2 18.6 -32.9 -11.7 -2.4 -0.9
Business, building and other support services 704.3 713.4 14.4 9.1 -14.5 1.3 -2.0
Educational services 1,308.6 1,314.5 16.2 5.9 18.7 0.5 1.4
Health care and social assistance 2,236.9 2,248.4 19.5 11.5 63.2 0.5 2.9
Information, culture and recreation 776.7 780.1 14.8 3.4 -21.6 0.4 -2.7
Accommodation and food services 1,190.4 1,203.5 17.2 13.1 58.3 1.1 5.1
Other services 749.6 754.7 13.8 5.1 -17.7 0.7 -2.3
Public administration 936.7 937.9 13.0 1.2 19.2 0.1 2.1
  1. North American Industry Classification System.
  2. Average standard error for change in two consecutive months. See “Sampling variability of estimates” in the section “About the Labour Force Survey” at the end of the publication Labour Force Information(Catalogue number71-001-X) for further explanations.
  3. Also referred to as forestry, fishing, mining, quarrying, oil and gas.

Note(s):

The sum of individual categories may not always add up to the total as a result of rounding.

Source(s):

CANSIM tables 282-0088 and 282-0089.

 

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Unemployment is like it is 2008 Again

On Friday Stats Canada came out with another happier Jobs Report, reporting that Employment Numbers up and the Unemployment rate down to where it was in 2008 (before all the economic silliness of the past few years).  Their exact statement was:

Employment rose for the second consecutive month, up 43,000 in October. This pushed the unemployment rate down 0.3 percentage points to 6.5%, the lowest rate since November 2008.

Quite cheery numbers given it does not seem like we are in a big recovery, but these numbers suggest that at least we are back to where we were in terms of unemployment (if you believe those numbers, that is).

The unemployment graph looks quite encouraging:

Unemployment Graph for Canada

Unemployment for the Past Little While

The more interesting numbers are in the detailed sections, where Stats Can points out:

Compared with October 2013, part-time employment rose by 101,000 (+3.0%) and full-time employment was up 81,000 (+0.6%). Over the same period, the number of hours worked rose slightly (+0.4%).

So the economy continues to grow part-time jobs, how many of our young folks are working multiple part-time jobs to be able to live? That would be a very interesting stat, but the number of hours worked rose so that hints that there are more hours being worked at least.

[continue reading…]

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Good Job Picture for September in Canada

Friday before the Long Weekend our friends at Stats Canada published some relatively good news for the Canadian Economy, with 74000 more folks employed in September (2014). Coincidently the unemployment rate dropped 2/10 of a percent as well, so all in all a rosier picture, with unemployment the lowest it has been since December 2008 (nearly the beginning of the economic collapse).

Empoloyment

Chart 1 Employment for past while

The graph seems to look more optimistic. The areas where employment increased the most was youths aged 15 to 24 and women aged 25 to 54. The more youth employment is a very good thing for the economy, as this is the area where employment has lagged badly since the great collapse.

The sectors where there were increases in employment were in accommodation and food services; health care and social assistance; construction; natural resources; also in finance, insurance, real estate and leasing. There was some bad employment news was  numbers were down in educational services.

For me, a really good piece of news is that the number of private sector employees increased in September, which means the economy is creating jobs (not just the government).

Adjusted to the concepts used in the United States, the unemployment rate in Canada was 5.9% in September, the same as the US rate.

Good to see we are keeping up with our American cousins in terms of job creation.

Unemployment

Unemployment Graph for the Past Little While

The Big Table

As usual I include some data from the Big Data tables from Stats Canada so you can see the data yourself and make your own conclusions:

Employment by class of worker and industry (based on NAICS1) – Seasonally adjusted

August 2014 September 2014 Std error2 August to
Sept 2014
Sept 2013
to Sept 2014
August to Sept
2014
Sept 2013
to Sept 2014
thousands change in thousands % change
Class of worker
Employees 15,096.8 15,226.4 35.6 129.6 150.2 0.9 1.0
Self-employed 2,754.7 2,699.1 25.9 -55.6 0.2 -2.0 0.0
Public/private sector employees
Public 3,676.0 3,682.0 25.0 6.0 88.1 0.2 2.5
Private 11,420.8 11,544.4 38.2 123.6 62.0 1.1 0.5
All industries 17,851.4 17,925.5 28.5 74.1 150.4 0.4 0.8
Goods-producing sector 3,835.9 3,896.1 26.0 60.2 -12.8 1.6 -0.3
Agriculture 298.4 295.2 7.8 -3.2 -19.3 -1.1 -6.1
Natural resources3 352.2 379.9 7.9 27.7 -1.1 7.9 -0.3
Utilities 150.2 148.9 5.3 -1.3 -2.9 -0.9 -1.9
Construction 1,322.7 1,352.6 17.6 29.9 13.3 2.3 1.0
Manufacturing 1,712.4 1,719.5 18.9 7.1 -2.9 0.4 -0.2
Services-producing sector 14,015.6 14,029.4 34.4 13.8 163.2 0.1 1.2
Trade 2,713.3 2,700.4 24.3 -12.9 -20.9 -0.5 -0.8
Transportation and warehousing 887.4 878.6 14.6 -8.8 18.9 -1.0 2.2
Finance, insurance, real estate and leasing 1,087.7 1,108.6 16.7 20.9 -31.1 1.9 -2.7
Professional, scientific and technical services 1,391.2 1,376.2 18.7 -15.0 25.8 -1.1 1.9
Business, building and other support services 693.6 694.7 14.2 1.1 -33.5 0.2 -4.6
Educational services 1,331.1 1,286.9 16.2 -44.2 10.6 -3.3 0.8
Health care and social assistance 2,216.8 2,248.5 19.4 31.7 69.3 1.4 3.2
Information, culture and recreation 796.6 788.9 14.8 -7.7 -0.8 -1.0 -0.1
Accommodation and food services 1,149.3 1,196.9 17.1 47.6 64.2 4.1 5.7
Other services 770.3 775.6 13.5 5.3 -0.1 0.7 0.0
Public administration 978.5 974.2 12.4 -4.3 60.9 -0.4 6.7
1.North American Industry Classification System.
2.Average standard error for change in two consecutive months. See “Sampling variability of estimates” in the section “About the Labour Force Survey” at the end of the publication Labour Force Information (Catalogue number71-001-X) for further explanations.
3.Also referred to as forestry, fishing, mining, quarrying, oil and gas.
Note(s): 
Related CANSIM tables 282-0088 and 282-0089. The sum of individual categories may not always add up to the total as a result of rounding.

 

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Moribund Job Growth in July in Canada

Nothing good, in Friday’s message from Stats Canada about jobs in Canada, but then again nothing horrendous, mostly stagnant in the world of job creation in Canada. The real news from Stats Canada is almost discouraging:

Overall employment was unchanged in July, as gains in part-time work were offset by losses in full-time. A decline in the number of people searching for work pushed the unemployment rate down 0.1 percentage points to 7.0%.

So we are back to the world where we lose Full Time jobs, and they are replaced by Part Time jobs? This is not a good thing long-term for the employees. Part-time employees cost less for most employers with less (or no) benefits and an ability to limit their hours as well. I am surprised the large Unions aren’t saying much about this topic. Hopefully it will be part of the next Federal Election discussions, as we have a younger generation of folks with multiple part-time jobs, is that model sustainable?

The fact that less folks are looking is even more discouraging. Why aren’t these folks looking any more?

Employment Canada

Employment graph for the past little while

The one positive thing mentioned is that there are more 15 to 24 year olds employed, and less over 55 year olds, but then again, the younger set is much more likely to be working part-time jobs.

As I have mentioned before much of this data depends highly on how it is interpreted (as I have mentioned in Damn Lies and Data) and Stats Canada admits that if they calculated unemployment the way the U.S. interprets it, our unemployment rate would be 6.0% (instead of 7.0% as they mentioned on Friday).

Unemployment Canada Stats Canada

Unemployment for the Past Little While

The Big Table

This month let’s explore employment by Industry, which is telling as well.

Employment by class of worker and industry (based on NAICS1) – Seasonally adjusted

June 2014 July 2014 Std error June
to July 2014
July 2013
to July 2014
June to
July 2014
July 2013
to July 2014
thousands change in thousands % change
Class of worker
Employees 15,115.9 15,145.3 35.6 29.4 161.0 0.2 1.1
Self-employed 2,704.8 2,675.6 25.9 -29.2 -45.7 -1.1 -1.7
Public/private sector employees
Public 3,637.8 3,641.0 25.0 3.2 47.9 0.1 1.3
Private 11,478.0 11,504.3 38.2 26.3 113.1 0.2 1.0
All industries 17,820.7 17,820.9 28.5 0.2 115.3 0.0 0.7
Goods-producing sector 3,852.1 3,818.1 26.0 -34.0 -91.8 -0.9 -2.3
Agriculture 299.2 296.7 7.8 -2.5 -20.7 -0.8 -6.5
Natural resources 351.3 355.9 7.9 4.6 -11.0 1.3 -3.0
Utilities 153.7 148.2 5.3 -5.5 3.9 -3.6 2.7
Construction 1,337.1 1,294.9 17.6 -42.2 -49.7 -3.2 -3.7
Manufacturing 1,710.9 1,722.4 18.9 11.5 -14.2 0.7 -0.8
Services-producing sector 13,968.6 14,002.9 34.4 34.3 207.2 0.2 1.5
Trade 2,726.1 2,726.5 24.3 0.4 15.2 0.0 0.6
Transportation and warehousing 897.4 909.4 14.6 12.0 53.6 1.3 6.3
Finance, insurance, real estate and leasing 1,096.8 1,099.7 16.7 2.9 -22.4 0.3 -2.0
Professional, scientific and technical services 1,364.1 1,362.0 18.7 -2.1 6.0 -0.2 0.4
Business, building and other support services 703.5 692.9 14.2 -10.6 -52.6 -1.5 -7.1
Educational services 1,292.1 1,324.2 16.2 32.1 33.7 2.5 2.6
Health care and social assistance 2,238.5 2,210.0 19.4 -28.5 87.1 -1.3 4.1
Information, culture and recreation 790.1 805.2 14.8 15.1 53.0 1.9 7.0
Accommodation and food services 1,125.5 1,139.6 17.1 14.1 21.5 1.3 1.9
Other services 787.7 775.5 13.5 -12.2 -7.8 -1.5 -1.0
Public administration 946.6 958.0 12.4 11.4 20.2 1.2 2.2
1. North American Industry Classification System.
2. Average standard error for change in two consecutive months. See “Sampling variability of estimates” in the section “About the Labour Force Survey” at the end of the publication Labour Force Information (Catalogue number71-001-X) for further explanations.
3. Also referred to as forestry, fishing, mining, quarrying, oil and gas.
Note(s): 
Related CANSIM tables 282-0088 and 282-0089. The sum of individual categories may not always add up to the total as a result of rounding.

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