Time: The Most Important Financial Variable


For those of you who haven’t had as many financial plans and projects fail as I have, I’d like to share with you the most important variable in all of your plans, and that is Time (no not the magazine, the passing of moments).

Time will fix many things, but assuming you can do things quickly is usually the problem that trips up most plans and projects.

Typically a repayment plan will be quite simple:

Payment per Period = Debt / # of periods

However, there are two things wrong with this plan, first is you aren’t taking into consideration that your debt will grow with an interest rate, look up Future Value of Money on line or look up the PMT() function in Excel to figure out what the debt is going to grow. The other major variable here is the # of periods, and that is where most plans fall over.

People are always optimistic when they start debt pay back schemes (this is my opinion, but based on observation of many friends) and think it will be easy to pay things off quickly, without taking into consideration that Life, Karma, or Sh*t, happens (depending on your religious point of view). If you are overly optimistic with any plan (speaking as a Project Manager now), you will fail, or you will spend all of your time attempting to catch up.

$1 Commemorative from 1967

$1 Commemorative from 1967 which is very much in the past!

If you are much more conservative in your planning, time can be your friend. This is not to say that you should amortize your car over 10 years, or your house over 50 (if you could), however, don’t get too aggressive in your plans.

A good rule of thumb is to make up a plan initially, and then walk away from it for a day. The day later look at it and ask yourself

  • Can I live with this payment plan? Is this going to hurt a little or be agonizingly painful and will make me miserable?
  • What other sh*t is going to happen? (the realistic answer is “I don’t know”) Plan for bad things, give yourself a little slack (I didn’t say let it fall on the ground, but a little slack)
  • Have I tried this before and succeeded? The answer is most likely Yes and No, since you are doing it again (if you are really good at building up debt and then just as good at paying it off, good on you, but why are you living on a roller coaster?).

Time, it passes very quickly plan accordingly.

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  • LifeInsuranceCanada.com November 7, 2012, 9:14 AM

    For anyone who’s new to finances, this should be a lightbulb moment. Time value of money is immense, it’s what makes little changes have big impacts, little interest rates turn into big sums.

    Reply

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