My 5 Best Investments

I have written previously about my 4 best investments, but I feel it is important to update and follow up on that statement. I now feel I have 5 best investments that I can boast about.

5 Best Investments

Last week one of my daughters graduated as a Chiropractor, so now my 5 best investments are

The last 2 investments I didn’t actually spend that much on, but the previous three I feel were mostly my investments. I did have a rule that I pay for the 1st degree (and if I pay for a degree I don’t pay for a wedding). As with all rules they have not been adhered to verbatim.

My parents invested in my education, and for that I am eternally grateful. I have had folks comment that if a child pays for their own education, they are more invested in the process. In my case, letting my parents down was actually a strong motivating factor, so I think that is a wash in terms of arguments.

I like the fact that it wasn’t a foreign investment either. I don’t think I could have afforded sending my kids outside of the country, it was expensive enough out of the city.  If you are planning on helping your kids, an RESP is where you should start with your plan, and then look into CO-OP programs, OSAP and the Scholarships out there (and there are many).

Regrets?

My guess is if I hadn’t put the money away that I used to help my kids’ educations I would have blown it on something stupid, so I am glad I can point to something tangible for where the money went. It has also been pointed out that I didn’t do any of the work (aside from repairing a few computers). Why is this a good investment? I have always relied on the good works of others.

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Textbooks are too Expensive

The business of post secondary education, and training programs has taken off in terms of profit margins in specific areas, but none more than in the area of textbooks.

When I was a student (many years ago), the profit centers for Universities were:

  • Tuition Fees
  • Government Funding
  • Private Funding
  • Gifts from alumni
  • Services on campus
textbooks
Those Two Books Cost Almost as Much as 1 Term Tuition when I was at School.

There was also another income center which was shared between the professors and the school and that was the sale of textbooks. When I started at U of Waterloo there were not that many texts on computers, and the ones we used were quite expensive, but now the entire text book market has exploded, and the prices have increased a great deal.

Why, is my question, are textbooks still so darn expensive? The simple answer is, profits, and a captive audience. If a professor makes the textbook compulsory for a course, he is forcing students to either:

  • Buy the textbook new
  • Buy it from a Used Book Store (which many times, is a previous version and may not be up to date, or worse a different text is to be used (which happens a lot in technology courses)).
  • Rent the book ? Yes there are such services out there as well.
  • Find a “boot leg” PDF, or similar “unofficial” version

These textbook costs are on top of the new Large Service fees from Universities, and also the costs of living away from home (if that is the case). Hope you folks are saving, if you plan on helping your kids out with post-secondary education costs.

How expensive can these books be? In the photo in this post, those two books added up to $350.00, and there were other books that could have been purchased.

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My Four Best Investments

Over my financial career I have made many mistakes investing, however there are a few of my best investments. I have revised this list and now I have five (5) best investments.

My first investment (but not my best) is buying into the Federal Public Service Pension Plan. Thanks to blind luck, I was able to do this, and while it is my biggest investment (yes, even more than my house), it is not the investment that I am most proud. As I outlined in a previous post, thanks to some excellent timing (read luck) on my part I was able to transfer my Nortel Pension into the Federal Public Service Pension plan, and that will (hopefully) allow me to actually retire.

best investments
Trent University

My 3 best investments (of which I am equally proud) are:

  • A Bachelor of Arts Degree from Wilfrid Laurier University
  • A Bachelor of Kinesiology Degree from Acadia University
  • An Honours Bachelor of Science Degree from Trent University (and hopefully a teaching diploma from Queens University)

As you can tell from the list these are the three degrees that, thanks to some help from my RESPs ,that I helped my daughters’ receive. My youngest daughter has just graduated from Trent University, and as I mentioned in the post I did for me eldest daughter’s degree So That is What $50,000 looks like, it was another excellent investment. Whether my son goes to post-secondary education, we shall see (we are hopeful), but so far aside from being able to retire, I feel I have gone 3 for 3 on these investments (making them my best investments).

This is not to say, that if you have decided not to help your children with their post-secondary education you are a bad parent (far from it, many folks just cannot afford to help their kids), just that I have made some awful investments in my time, luckily I have made a few good ones as well.

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Proliteracy.ca – Like Cheese on Vegetables

Let me preface this, that this is a Guest Post from a group of chaps I tripped over a while ago. Sounds like an interesting idea to me teaching folks about the costs of University, they are looking for feedback, have a read and see what you think.

Feels like cheese

by Alfred Yang

For those of you who lived through the 90’s, remember that old Cheese Whiz commercial where kids are reluctant to eat their vegetables until they’re garnished the amazing product? Well, that commercial kept replaying in my head as I worked on Proliteracy.ca, a free tool that helps Canadians plan finances for post-secondary education.

I can’t help but get the feeling that personal finance education is a lot like vegetables.  We all know it’s good for you, but it isn’t that appealing, especially to young people.  I feel like our team at Proliteracy.ca is trying to create the secret sauce that makes something dry and boring more consumable.

Fortunately, from the start of our journey we’ve met many organizations and individuals who share the same passion for promoting financial literacy.  Subject matter experts in the field of personal finance, like Big Cajun Man, gave us the motivation to continue our work.   Today, Proliteracy.ca is available to all Canadians looking to understand post-secondary financing.

The secret sauce?

Despite the rapid evolution of financial technology, it has yet to change the way most consumers educate themselves about personal finance.  The internet gives us incredible access to information, but it can be overwhelming.  The Proliteracy.ca team wanted to find a way to help people filter through the noise to focus on what’s really important to their own situations.

Our team wanted to start by helping students and young parents, a demographic that is arguably the least motivated to learn about personal finance.  Ironically, most members in this very same demographic have a major financial hurdle to overcome – financing post-secondary education.  Tuition has been increasing steadily in the past two decades and according to the Canadian Federation of Students the average new grad from university owes over $28,000 in student debt.

Through extensive research, we found plenty of information on financing post-secondary education, but when considering our own personal situations, a number of questions still remain unanswered:

  • If I have a young child today, how much should I be saving towards?
  • How does studying in a different school or different city impact my cost?
  • How much money should I set aside each month so that I am not too late by the time my child is ready for college?
  • Beside savings, what other financing options are available?
  • How does borrowing impact my child’s financial future?

Our Goals

Proliteracy.ca aims to help forecast the cost of education based on each student’s personal situation. We do the heavy lifting to organize data that’s freely available so that it’s more accessible and easier to understand.

First, we prompt you to answer a few questions, including programs and schools of interest, and the year of enrollment. Then we forecast the cost of tuition, books, and other expenses based on historical data. The end result is a good estimate of the financial target you or your family should be aiming for when planning for post-secondary education.

With an understanding of cost, we’re able to suggest a variety funding options starting with the least expensive options: savings, grants and scholarships.  We build awareness to great federal programs like the Canadian Learning Bond (CLB) and Canadian Education Savings Grants (CESG) and highlight the impact they have on RESP savings.  We also perform grants and scholarships matching, allowing families to take advantage of resources that are otherwise unknown to them before taking on debt.

Eat your vegetables, they’re good for you

In October, we ran a pilot program at three different high schools in the Greater Toronto Area.   We found that students and many young parents are generally not motivated to learn about personal finance. Most are not prepared for the high cost of post-secondary education.  Tuition is increasing well beyond the rate of inflation, and a child’s college or university education a decade from now could easily set a family back by over six figures.  Most individuals we spoke to admit that they are planning finances for post-secondary education too late.

Like eating vegetables, financial planning needs to start early in life.  When confronted with a significant financial hurdle like cost of post-secondary education, families need to get into the rhythm of saving, learning about funding options and understanding the implications of debt.

We need your help

Since our pilot launch, we’ve received a lot of encouragement and feedback on how we can improve. While our team is making great strides towards creating an amazing planning tool, we can get there a lot faster by working with individuals and organizations who share the same passion for financial literacy.

So, if you have any feedback at all, we’d love to hear from you.

www.proliteracy.ca

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Should I have “The Talk” With My Kids

The answer to that for every parent is YES! You should have “the talk” about money as soon as your kids understand what money is and start asking for it (or treating you like a never-ending golden stream of money). Making sure your child has a mature and caring understanding about money is a very important part of parenting.

My parents never had “the Talk” with me, and I had to learn a lot of what I initially knew from magazines and on the street, or worse from the school of hard knocks. If you think you are a Subject Expert then by all means have that conversation. If you know someone who is more skilled at the financial arts, bring them in and discuss things frankly and with an open mind with your kids.

Point out that there are many ways to save money, and there are even people who go with Alternate (financial) lifestyles, and even put their money in Dividend Paying stocks (on purpose), not that there is anything wrong with that. As I have always said, “To each his or her own”, who am I to dictate how people should save, as long as they are happy doing it, and aren’t harming anyone.

With no understanding of how money works, the real danger for your child is (naturally) debt.  Without “the talk” kids might think you could only get into debt from having the wrong purse, from begin victims of identity theft, from using public ATMs, or other uninformed ideas. Without a good understanding kids are much more likely to end up in debt, and once that happens, will they be able to get out of it?

Am I being facetious and mocking Sex Education? No, I am just pointing out that most parents worry a great deal about their kids learning about procreation, sex and such, but not many seem to spend much time teaching their kids about money (nor do they seem to care if the education system does either). Without any financial education your kids are almost as likely to bring home a bundle for you to help take care of, a large debt! 

Talk about Sex but Not Money?

Most parents will make sure their son has a condom when they go out on a date, but don’t seem to worry when they get a credit card and go out for the night? Think about it, it might keep them from moving into your basement, permanently.

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